Virtute Innovation Academy

School Information 2023-2024

Virtute Innovation Academy (BSID#880681) has been a successfully inspected private secondary school in the Province of Ontario since 2018 offering both onsite and online education and take pride in awarding students the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) upon successful graduation. The Ontario Ministry of Education has issued the BSID #880681 to Virtute Innovation Academy.

Virtute Innovation Academy’s goal is to ensure their students will gain the skills and principles necessary to get themselves accepted into and prepared to study at top universities and have a successful career in what they choose and pursue to do and accomplish in life both professionally and personally.

 

The importance and value of completing a secondary education and the school’s commitment to reach every student to help them achieve a successful outcome from the secondary school experience.

Every student in Ontario is required to remain in secondary school until they reach the age of eighteen or obtain an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). Virtute Innovation Academy is not a traditional secondary school and we believe we offer a high-quality education that embraces the changing face of education and provides students with opportunities to meet their goals while learning the skills they need to be successful in the changing face of post-secondary education and the workforce.

Virtute Innovation Academy’s Administrative staff promises to create and maintain meaningful and productive interactions between students to ensure that technology and learning online does not in any way deter the learning process. The Principal and teachers promise to provide meaningful and quality course content to meet the Ministry of Education Curriculum expectations and to properly prepare students for postsecondary opportunities and the workforce. The Principal and teachers also promise to allow parents to be involved in their child’s education by allowing access to course materials and assessments. Online grades, report cards, feedback and conferencing allow parents to stay up to date on their child’s progress.

Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) Requirement

Earning an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)

Virtute Innovation Academy is a private online secondary school offering Grades 9, 10, 11 and 12 Ontario Secondary School Diploma courses. Virtute Innovation Academy has been inspected by the Ontario Ministry of Education since 2018 and has met all inspection requirements to be given the right to issue Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) credits. OSSD credits are the same credits issued by all public schools in Ontario, which count towards the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. All of our online secondary school courses follow the Ontario Curriculum. Virtute Innovation Academy’s Ministry BSID# is 880681

 

What You Need: OSSD Requirements

The credits needed for graduation with an OSSD are different depending on when a student first enrolled in high school. But all diplomas require that students have a minimum amount of study in English, Mathematics, Science and other subject areas. Adult students (18 and over) may be able to receive credits for courses and training programs they took outside of secondary school.

Credit for Learning Outside High School

Get the credit you deserve. Students over 18 may be able to get a maximum of 12 credits for learning outside of Ontario high schools. You may be eligible for either maturity equivalent credits, or for Prior Learning Assessment (PLAR).

The mission of Virtute Innovation Academy secondary school is to develop critical thinkers, to foster resilience in students that is essential for great accomplishments, and to motivate students to be discerning believers in the importance of lifelong learning. 

Virtute Innovation Academy’s Philosophy:

 Every Child Is Valued

Our teachers and support staff are dedicated to making our students feel safe, important and valued. We teach our students to be curious, confident, resilient and independent learners by providing a stimulating atmosphere that supports risk-taking and encourages students to express their ideas.

Setting Our Students Up for Success

Our school follows the curriculum set out by the Ontario Ministry of Education and to adhere to the principles and policies outlined in “Growing Success: Assessment and Evaluation, and Reporting in Ontario Schools” in order to improve student learning. Due to the nature of our online courses, we are also able to enhance the curriculum to engage students, promote interaction and differentiate activities to meet the needs of all learners.

Leadership Opportunities

One way in which we encourage leadership is through participation in Duke of Edinburgh Award program, Cooperative Opportunities in the community, Community Volunteer work and being encouraged to model and share knowledge and ideas through class discussion.

Anti-Bullying

We do not tolerate bullying in our school. Students are expected follow an online code of conduct. Teachers encourage their students to seek to understand the actions and feelings of others without passing judgment. We provide a structured, safe and respectful environment wherein students are expected to show compassion, empathy and acceptance.

Communication With Students and Parents

Virtute Innovation Academy fosters communications between the student and teacher upon enrollment in order to begin the dialogue concerning teacher expectations in the course. Parents are kept up-to-date through regular communication in the form of newsletters, online blog, Twitter posts, Facebook page and access to teacher’s contact information. Teachers make themselves available to answer any questions from students or parents. Parents and students are very appreciative of the emphasis our teachers place on ensuring good communication between home and school. All school administrative staff will have their contact information viewable from our main website. Virtute Innovation Academy will enable all staff to receive student feedback in order to create the best course to meet the needs of their students. Virtute Innovation Academy will encourage an environment where student and parent voicing of concerns is encouraged and welcomed and that any concerns are addressed promptly and effectively.

International Students

It is Virtute Innovation Academy’s intent to welcome international students to take Ontario secondary school credits. Virtute Innovation Academy will be aware of the unique educational needs of international students and provide support to ensure the best possible educational experience.

Flexible to the Educational Needs of Our Students

Virtute Innovation Academy provides a student-centered education in an online environment. Virtute Innovation Academy offers students a continuous intake course option, a work at their own pace model for completely online students and a monitored and structured model for the blended learning day students. The teacher contacts the student upon registration in order to provide the necessary information to the student so he or she can begin the online course right away,

To provide professional School Services to our Students

Virtute Innovation Academy will establish and maintain OUAC or OCAS accounts for our OSR students planning to enter post-secondary institutions upon graduation from high school. Virtute Innovation Academy will produce and forward copies of the Ontario Student transcripts to post-secondary institutions in a timely manner. Virtute Innovation Academy will make arrangements for students to write the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) and offer services to help all students prepare for the test and receive accommodations if applicable. To establish a Virtute Innovation Academy Individual Education Plan (IEP) for exceptional students in order to identify the student’s specific learning expectations and how these expectations are to be accommodated within their online and onsite course. It is Virtute Innovation Academy’s responsibility to establish and maintain Ontario Student Records (OSR) for those students who are the sole responsibility of Virtute Innovation Academy following the Ontario Ministry of Education’s guidelines. Finally, it is the responsibility of Virtute Innovation Academy to determine the equivalent credits earned by students entering the Ontario school system in their previous educational setting and to advise the student on the remaining requirements to be completed in order to earn the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).

The Academy / The School (online)

Every student in Ontario is required to remain in secondary school until they reach the age of eighteen or obtain the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). Virtute Innovation Academy aims to provide each student with the opportunity to achieve success according to the student’s own interests, abilities, and goals. By providing a quality online and onsite education within the student’s greater educational community, Virtute Innovation Academy can offer the student more choice in their educational endeavours. While Virtute Innovation Academy may have changed the form of the school in which this mission is carried out, they have not changed the provision of providing quality education to the student.

Student – Teacher Interaction

The student from anywhere in the world can interact in meaningful ways with their Virtute Innovation Academy teacher as long as they have an internet connection. A host of communication tools and procedures have been developed within the Canvas Learning Management System (LMS) to facilitate this essential communication component of a quality education. These include using ClassIn online classroom platform for teacher with student face-to-face live-streamed real-time video sessions/meetings and exchanging messages and, documents & files, etc. plus email, threaded discussions, ePortfolio, assignment feedback through the Dropbox, and testing feedback. A Virtute Innovation Academy student has many ways of communicating with their teacher and the teacher has many options to communicate information and ideas back to the student.

Student – Student Interaction

A host of communication tools and procedures have been developed within the Canvas Learning Management System (LMS) facilitate student – student interaction, an essential component of a quality education. A student has many ways of communicating with other students in their course. These include using ClassIn classroom online platform, email, chat, instant messaging, sharing ePortfolio files and threaded discussions. Students may also respond to discussion threads from students who may have completed a course before them.

Student – Administration Interaction

With multiple tools at their disposal, the Virtute Innovation Academy Principal and administration staff may intervene early in managing attendance, proper conduct, and other problems within the various courses. The goal is to ensure that the technology does not become a deterrent to effective learning. Prompt and early intervention solves small problems before they become impediments to the learning process. The student has quick and easy access to the principal and other staff via their Class list and the Contact Us page.

Student – Resources Interaction

The student has access to quality online courses and can easily view resources to enhance their learning experience. The student will also have access to both career information, which is being built into every course to meet with Ministry Program Consideration expectations, as well as more general career information provided on an ‘as-needed’ basis. In addition, Virtute Innovation Academy provides access for all students whose Ontario Student Record (OSR) is held at Virtute Innovation Academy. This program allows students to plan their education, review their options for post-secondary programs, and assists in the course selection process.

Parent – School Interaction

The parents or guardians of students under 18 and the parents or guardians, with the permission of adult students, may have access to the student’s online course including assessment and evaluation items. If the student does not share the access directly with the parent, the parent can contact the Virtute Innovation Academy Principal for information. This allows the parents to become more involved with the education of their child. An online, transparent electronic grade book, electronic report cards, online conferencing, and direct phone contact with the Virtute Innovation Academy Principal, also promotes parental involvement.

Periodic news items are posted online at the Virtute Innovation Academy website by the school to an area viewable by parents and the broader community.

With Virtute Innovation Academy, parents have the responsibility and opportunity to work with their child in the planning of their secondary school education. The final decision of the course selection of students under the age of 18 rests with the parents. All students and their parents should consider seriously the advice and recommendation of the school. The consequences of course selection can be extremely important whether students plan to work or attend college or university or post-secondary institution. Detailed courses of study are available at the school website.

Hardware and Software Requirements

Students should have access to a stable high-quality internet connection and an up-to-date laptop or desktop computer with a microphone and video camera. Recommended software includes Adobe Acrobat Reader and word processor and spreadsheet applications such as Microsoft Word and Excel.

Students will need a Gmail account to access Google+ Hangouts for video conferencing and whiteboard applications.

Canvas Learning Management System is an online Learning Management System (LMS) and the ClassIn classroom online platform requires an internet connection to be accessed. In order to login and use the service your browser is required to have JavaScript and Cookies enabled, and it should be set to allow pop-ups and redirects from www.viaschool.ca

Canvas Learning Management System (LMS) environment continuously updates and is supported on the following platforms with the latest browser versions.

Desktop Browser Support:

Platform

Apple® Safari®

Google® Chrome™

Microsoft® Edge

Mozilla® Firefox®

Apple® Mac OS®

 Yes

 Yes

 Yes

Yes

Microsoft® Windows®

  No

 Yes

 Yes

Yes

Tablet/Mobile Browser/Operating System Support:

Platform

Apple® Safari®

Google® Chrome™

Microsoft® Edge

Mozilla® Firefox®

Apple® OS® for iPhone® and iPad®

  Yes

  No

 No

 No

Android™ IOS for Android phones and tablets

   No

  Yes

 No

 No

Some courses also require the use of additional software that is provided in the course. Some courses may require additional hardware such as a camera, a microphone, or speakers. Please refer to the specific course outline to determine if any additional software or hardware is required or provided in the course.

 

Virtute Innovation Academy believes in Individually Timetabling students to meet their needs.

There will be blocks that are continuous throughout the year and similar for all students, but there is flexibility available to tailor a timetable to the individual needs of a student.

Example of a Virtute Innovation Academy Grade 9 student timetable (semester courses and 2 continuous learning courses):

Time

Block/Sem.

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thurs.

Fri.

9:15-10:25

Block 1 Semester 1

ENL1W

Grade 9 English

ENL1W

Grade 9 English

ENL1W

Grade 9 English

ENL1W

Grade 9 English

ENL1W

Grade 9 English

 

Block 1 Semester 2

SNC1D

Grade 9 Science

SNC1D

Grade 9 Science

SNC1D

Grade 9 Science

SNC1D

Grade 9 Science

SNC1D

Grade 9 Science

10:25-11:35

Block 2

Semester 1

CGC1D

Grade 9 Geography

CGC1D

Grade 9

Geography

CGC1D

Grade 9

Geography

CGC1D

Grade 9

Geography

CGC1D

Grade 9

Geography

 

Block 2

Semester 2

FRL1W

Grade 9 French

FRL1W

Grade 9 French

FRL1W

Grade 9 French

FRL1W

Grade 9 French

FRL1W

Grade 9 French

11:35-12:35

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

12:35-1:45

Block 3

Semester 1

AVI1O

Grade 9

Visual Arts

AVI1O

Grade 9

Visual Arts

AVI1O

Grade 9

Visual Arts

AVI1O

Grade 9

Visual Arts

AVI1O

Grade 9

Visual Arts

 

Block 3

Semester 2

BTT1O

Information and Communication Technology in Business

BTT1O

Information and Communication Technology in Business

BTT1O

Information and Communication Technology in Business

BTT1O

Information and Communication Technology in Business

BTT1O

Information and Communication Technology in Business

1:45-2:35

 

Continuous Learning Block (courses students will take all year)

Physical Education PPL1OF

2:30-3:15

Continuous Learning Block (courses students will take all year)

Math MPM1DR

 

Any interested person in learning more about secondary education at Virtute Innovation Academy will find the relevant policies set out in Ontario Schools: Policy and Program Requirements, 2011 (OS) as set out by the Ministry of Education of Ontario to be particularly informative.

Links to all of the appropriate Ontario Curriculum Documents are made available to parents, guardians and students from the Introduction Unit of each course. (See subsection 6.3) They are also available to the general public from the Ministry of Education’s website.

Reporting periods

Virtute Innovation Academy has continuous intake which means reporting periods differ and are based on the student’s time of enrollment in a course. However, there are day students that follow a semester time table and come to the bricks and mortar school traditionally. These students work on the same online courses, but with a subject area teacher in the classroom for support. Final Exams are in January and June and students will receive final report cards following the completion of the exams. Midterm reports are issued in November and all students are given a full disclosure date for when they must withdraw from a course for it to not show up on their Ontario Student Transcript (OST).

Academic Integrity

It is the responsibility of students to be academically honest in all aspects of their schoolwork so that the marks they receive are a true reflection of their own achievement. Academic dishonesty, therefore, is a serious offence, and, as a result, it is imperative that students understand what academic dishonesty entails and are clear as to consequences. It is the responsibility of school staff to communicate to students that academic honesty is required in all aspects of their school work.

Practicing academic honesty also demonstrates that students are:

  1. Self-directed, responsible, lifelong learners;
  2. Collaborative contributors, and
  3.  Responsible citizens.

Virtute Innovation Academy is committed to ensuring the integrity of student achievement within its courses by promoting academic honesty among its students. Students are responsible for upholding integrity and will be held accountable for the quality of their work and actions. Virtute Innovation Academy takes preventative measures to reduce the incidence of academic dishonesty among its students. Academic dishonesty consists of any deliberate attempt to falsify, fabricate or otherwise tamper with data information, records, or any other material that is relevant to the student’s participation within any course.

Student responsibilities include:

  • Demonstrating a commitment to learning through punctual and regular attendance, being prepared and ready to learn
  • Practicing honesty and integrity including, but not limited to, not participating in or encouraging plagiarism, misrepresentation of original work, use of unauthorized aids, theft of evaluation instruments, or false representation of identity
  • Following school rules and taking responsibility for his/her own actions
  • Refraining from bringing anything to school, or using anything inappropriately, that may risk the safety of themselves or others
  • Showing proper care and regard for school and community property, as well as only visiting other schools for school-related and authorized activities

Staff responsibilities include:

  • Helping students achieve to the best of their ability, developing self-worth, and being responsible citizens
  • Maintaining order in the school and holding everyone to the highest standard of respectful and responsible behaviour
  • Communicating regularly and meaningfully with parents/guardians
  • Establishing a range of clear, fair and developmentally appropriate interventions, supports, direct skill instruction and consequences for unacceptable behaviour including but not limited to homophobia, gender- based violence, sexual harassment and inappropriate sexual behaviour
  • Responding to and reporting behaviours which may have a negative impact on school climate

Parental Role:

Parents are encouraged to monitor and support the learning of their children by helping them create a studying schedule, and checking on assignment completion and submission. Parents are free to contact the school with any comments or concerns.

Academic Dishonesty is broadly understood to mean offences against the academic integrity of the learning environment. This would include, but is not limited, to the following:

  1. Copying from another student or making information available to another student for the purpose of copying during a test/ examination/ quiz or for individual/ group assignments;
  2. Failing to follow instructions of the presiding teacher during an examination;
  3. Submitting any written work (electronic or hard copy) in whole or in part which has been written by someone else;
  4. Using direct quotations or paraphrased material in any assignment without giving the proper acknowledgement.

Attendance

Regular attendance and participation are essential to school success. Students who do not participate regularly in their online courses regularly will risk experiencing a negative learning experience. Virtute Innovation Academy will maintain attendance records to ensure that students and teachers log into their courses on a regular basis. Due to the continuous entry and exit model of our fully online courses, there is not a yearly or semester calendar followed. Students who leave a course before completion must communicate their intentions either in writing to the Principal or over the phone before they will be officially withdrawn. Constant and relevant feedback and communication will be given to students to encourage regular attendance and participation. Students who have not completed their course within 18 months from the day of enrollment in that course, will be automatically unenrolled from the course.

It is important to note that as of December 20, 2006, all students under 18 years of age, are required to be in attendance at school unless they have already graduated or are otherwise excused from attendance at school.

 

 Attendance Policy for Online Only Students

School-Wide Attendance Policy:

  • The Ministry of Education mandates accurate attendance records of all students in a school. For purposes of attendance, Virtute Innovation Academy uses the notion that a student was “present” when he/she has actively engaged and completed a virtual lesson.

Attendance and Course Drop-Deadlines:

  • Once a student registers into a course they are expected tologin 5 times per week between Monday and Sunday and complete their coursework.
  • First Warning: A student has not logged in to the course and completed any work between 25-30 days.
  • Secondary Warning: A student has not logged in and completed any work in over 90+ days.
  • Final Warning: A drop deadline will be established after 180+ days if no communication is made from the students and/or no progress is made in the course.
  • The student will be dropped from the course. If this occurs before the midterm point of the course there will not be any academic penalty. If this occurs after 5 business days from when the midterm report card has been issued a ‘W’ ie. Withdrawal will be reported on their transcript. Grade 11 and 12 only.

 

At Virtute Innovation Academy, the online courses do not have schedules or due dates to follow. The courses are run on a continuous intake basis. Attendance is tracked by tracking student sign ins to ClassIn, the Canvas Learning Management System and/or Discussion Forum Posts. Students must login to the course 5 days a week between Monday and Sunday. Teachers may also require students to post on the Discussion Forum as a form of attendance. Students have up to 10 months in which to complete their courses and have the option to pay for course extensions if needed. The course outline indicates that the course will take 110 hours and highlights the breakdown of each unit. 

Student are expected to spend 4 to 6 hours after they log off to work on their off line activities including given homework, conduct research and work on their assignments, and these off line activities are also built into structured off line assignments and activities related to a course including building collaborative skills and having breaks from onscreen work to be able to utilize their local libraries for some of their assignments, and also, have group assignments which encourages them to be engaged with other students and to work with other students to develop communicate skills, and in the process, develop critical problem-solving skills to be ready to join the workforce. These off line activities include follow up work by Virtute Innovation Academy staff with the students and their parents.

Attendance Policy for Blended Learning Day Students

The attendance policy for Blended Learning Day Students is the same as in regular school. School begins at 9:00 am and ends at 3:00 pm. Most courses are semestered with scheduled assessments and exams. There is a lot more flexibility at Virtute Innovation Academy than a regular day school because all course content is online and students may work on coursework when they can’t attend school for such reasons as vacations, sporting events, illness etc. Just like Online students, the course outline indicates that the course will take 110 hours and highlights the breakdown of each unit.

 

 Attendance Policy for Onsite Only Students

School attendance is important and in order to receive the best education, students need to come to class. Virtute Innovation Academy’s system-wide attendance policy for students is consistent with those found in many public schools throughout Ontario Canada.

 

  • All students are required to attend school for 110 instructional hours per course
  • Academic penalties will not be imposed for excused
  • Whenever a student needs to miss more than 6.75 hours, the teacher will provide a Student Educational Monitoring Plan to lessen the impact of a student missing instruction in class.

Absences and Tardiness

Absenteeism and lateness will reduce the chance of a fair performance evaluation dramatically. Students with a legitimate reason for absence must submit appropriate documentation to support their claim. Legitimate documentation may include but is not limited to, a doctor’s note. The principal will reserve the right to determine the legitimacy of the documentation.

 

Note: For students who are under the age of 18, school will report all absences to:

  • Parents / Guardian
  • Canada Immigration and Citizenship

 

Excused absences can include:

  • Personal illness
  • Medical, dental, or mental health appointment
  • Serious illness in the student’s immediate family
  • A death in the student’s immediate family or of a relative
  • Religious holiday
  • Emergency conditions such as fire, flood, or storm
  • Unique family circumstances warranting absence and coordinated with school administration

 

Specific Absence Policy

  • On or before the SIXTH hour absence, the teacher will discuss with the student about their attendance performance and expectations for further improvement. In addition, the teacher will use email, phone, or written documents to inform parents of their students‟ absence if the students are under the age of 18. Teachers will speak to the students directly to discuss the consequence of irregular attendance on their academic
  • On or about the TWELFTH hour absence, a referral, specifying the dates absent shall be sent to the appropriate administrator. Meanwhile, a letter will be sent by administration to the parent/guardian or independent student to request a meeting to discuss the attendance concerns. At the meeting, the next steps will be discussed. These could include attendance, contracts, attendance improvement plans, or withdrawal from the course. Failure of the parent/guardian or student to meet with the appropriate administrator within seven days of the attendance letter will result in the student being withdrawn from that particular course.

 

Specific Late Policy

  • Students will not be allowed to enter class if they are more than 15 minutes late without parent verification; consequently, students must report to the Office for a late
  • Students who are late for less than 15 minutes but more than three times to any class could go to the class the right way and will be addressed by issuing a formal notice to the parent/guardian or to the student in person for every day they are late to attend class on time.
  • If the students have been late for more than three times, students will be required to attend a meeting with the administrator. And the teachers should do the reassessment to determine whether the student is still qualified to continue their course
  • The teacher will assess their ability to continue in the course. At the meeting, the onus will be on the parents/guardians or the student to ensure the lateness will cease. The student will be allowed to continue if the student successfully provides legitimate grounds for being late. However, if the students are late for the meeting they will be withdrawn from the course and no credit will be earned

 

Policies on Missing or Tardiness for Tests, Exams, or Assignments

The course grade is determined based on the student’s demonstration and the degree to which he/she meets the curriculum expectations. Attendance and punctuality are paramount with regard to Tests and Exams as in the prompt meeting of assignment deadlines. Lateness or Absence for Tests, or missing assignments can negatively affect the student’s academic assessments and evaluation results.

Students with legitimate reasons for missing tests, exams, and assignments or being behind the deadline must submit the appropriate documentation to support their claim. Legitimate reasons and documentation may include but are not limited to, illness and doctor’s note. The principal shall determine whether a student’s claim and documentation are acceptable.

 

LATE AND MISSED ASSIGNMENTS


It is made clear to students early in the school year that they are responsible not only for their behaviour in the classroom and the school but also for providing evidence of their achievement of the overall expectations within the time frame specified by the teacher, and in a form approved by the teacher. Students must understand that there will be consequences for not completing assignments for evaluation or for submitting those assignments late.

 

Students are responsible for their online behaviour and self-discipline throughout the school year. Late or missing assignments without any prior communication with the applicable teacher will be marked accordingly at the teacher’s discretion. Students must understand and accept the consequences of their actions. Virtute Innovation Academy encourages students to communicate any difficulties they may be having with the assignments prior to the due dates.  

To further assist students and prevent late and missed assignments, due dates will be clearly communicated and established. Students will honor these deadlines to maintain a consistent standard of excellence. Teachers will reach out to students who have not submitted work on time and students will be given an opportunity to explain why he/she has failed to complete the assignment in a timely manner. Teachers will determine whether the student can be offered an extension with no academic penalty.  

If the student deliberately submits a late assignment, then a late penalty is imposed. A 2% per day deduction maximum of 10% will apply. A new second-chance due date will be assigned with up to 10 days beyond the original due date will be offered to the student. If work is not submitted by the second chance agreed-upon deadline, the student may face a zero mark for that assignment. Parents will be notified via email if a student habitually submits late or incomplete assignments, and such behaviour will also be noted on the report card as part of the student’s evaluation. 

Virtute Innovation Academy guidance will reach out to the student to offer help with time-management skills and schedule planning if needed, but the student is ultimately responsible for the completion of all assignments to successfully complete the credits needed for an OSSD. 


Where in the teacher’s professional judgment it is appropriate to do so, a number of strategies may be used to help prevent and/or address late and missed assignments. They include:

  • asking the student to clarify the reason for not completing the assignment;
  • helping students develop better time-management skills;
  • collaborating with other staff to prepare a part- or full-year calendar of major assignment dates for every class;
  • planning for major assignments to be completed in stages, so that students are less likely to be faced with an all-or-nothing situation at the last minute;
  • maintaining ongoing communication with students and/or parents about due dates and late assignments, and scheduling conferences with parents if the problem persists;
  • in secondary schools, referring the student to the Student Success team or teacher;
  • taking into consideration legitimate reasons for missed deadlines;
  • setting up a student contract;
  • using counselling or peer tutoring to try to deal positively with problems;
  • holding teacher-student conferences;
  • reviewing the need for extra support for English language learners;
  • reviewing whether students require special education services;
  • requiring the student to work with a school team to complete the assignment;
  • for First Nation, Métis, and Inuit students, involving Aboriginal counsellors and members of the extended family;
  • understanding and taking into account the cultures, histories, and contexts of First Nation, Métis, and Inuit students and parents and their previous experiences with the school system;
  • providing alternative assignments or tests/exams where, in the teacher’s professional judgement, it is reasonable and appropriate to do so;

Code of Conduct for Computer Use

The school reserves the right to monitor all material in user accounts on the file server in order to determine the appropriateness of computer use when a challenge has arisen. The following processes have been put into place:

  • The customized Canvas Learning Management System (LMS) at Virtute Innovation Academy is intended for educational purposes only. Any use of any Canvas LMS tool within course for any other purpose other than the intended educational purpose is prohibited. The inappropriate uses include, but are not limited to, criminal, obscene, commercial, or illegal purposes.
  • Student access into the Canvas LMS is provided as long as the student follows the guidelines set by the school Principal, provincial, and federal laws.
  • If Canvas LMS is used inappropriately or in a prohibited manner, the Principal reserves the right to terminate the registration or suspend the user. There is the possibility of further disciplinary action including legal prosecution, if the appropriate laws, regulations, or contracts deem it necessary.
  • Malicious LMS network damage, interference or mischief will be reported to the appropriate authorities.
  • It is important to be aware that activities in an online environment are not private. The school reserves the right to monitor all material that is placed in a user’s account and to remove it if deemed necessary.
  • The security of the online environment is only as effective as the practices of its users. Therefore, it is important that the student user:
  • Never reveal your password to your course to any individual except your parent.
  • Always report to your Principal any email or chat message which causes you concern or any message which requests inappropriate personal information from you.
  • Never attempt to access unauthorized material or to impersonate another user. Any attempt to vandalize, harm or destroy data of another user is prohibited. Any attempt to vandalize the data of the course or school is also prohibited.

 

Plagiarism

Plagiarism occurs when a student presents another person’s work as the student’s own. The Virtute Innovation Academy Plagiarism Policy is designed to teach the student to identify plagiarism, to distinguish between the two types of plagiarism, to identify strategies to avoid plagiarism, to practice proper paraphrasing, and to explain the consequences of plagiarism by the student. Virtute Innovation Academy teachers have access to software that detects plagiarism. Commercial search engines are often very good at detecting work copied from material available online.

 

Negligent Plagiarism means presenting someone else’s work as your own in an accidental, naïve, careless, or reckless way. This often happens when a student paraphrases incorrectly or when a student borrows words or phrases from another source and forgets to cite the source.

Dishonest Plagiarism means that the student has knowingly presenting a person’s work as their own. All instances of plagiarism that are not considered to be negligent plagiarism will be assumed to be dishonest plagiarism.

Cheating and Plagiarism
“Learning is enhanced when students think independently and honestly”. It is expected that students will demonstrate respect for the intellectual property rights of others and adhere to a code of honor in all course activities. Students must understand that the tests/exams they complete and the assignments they submit for evaluation must be their own work and that cheating and plagiarism will not be condoned.

Plagiarism is defined by Virtute Innovation Academy as
The use of ideas or thoughts of a person other than the writer, without proper acknowledgment;

The use of direct quotations, or of material paraphrased and/or summarized by the writer;

The submission of an assignment that has been written in part or in whole by someone else as one’s own; and

The submission of material that has been obtained from a computerized source, with or without minor modifications, as one’s own.

Cheating is defined by Virtute Innovation Academy as
The buying and/or selling of assignments, or exam/test questions;

Submission of the same piece of work in more than one course without the permission of the teacher;

The preparation of an assignment by someone else other than the stated writer;
Allowing one’s assignment to be copied by someone else;

Providing another student with your assignment;

The unauthorized giving or receiving of information or assistance during an examination or a test.

Academic dishonesty destroys the integrity of the program by diminishing the learning experience for the entire Virtute Innovation Academy community. Therefore, maintaining academic integrity is imperative. Whether intentionally or through ignorance of the policy, acts of academic dishonesty are unacceptable and will not be tolerated. These acts and the parties involved will receive a mark of zero for the assignment. In addition, all students involved will be subject to additional consequences which will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. These consequences will reflect a continuum of behavioral and academic responses and consequences, based on at least the following four factors:

  1. The grade level of the student,
  2. The maturity of the student,
  3. The number and frequency of incidents, and
  4. The individual circumstances of the student.

 

Cheating and Plagiarism Policy

VIA commits to having policies for assessments that minimize the risk of

cheating. We also commit to begin each course with refresher learning on academic integrity.

In the event of incidents of academic dishonesty, the student, the Academic Director (and, in the case of students under 18, their parents) will be notified of the occurrence, of the consequence, and of the potential consequences of subsequent incidents.

Improper Citation

First Instance: A warning and an opportunity to redo the piece.

Subsequent Instance: An opportunity to redo the piece to a maximum grade of 75%.

Unaccredited Paraphrasing

First Instance: An opportunity to redo the piece to a maximum grade of 75%.

Subsequent Instance: An opportunity to redo the piece to a maximum grade of 50%.

Unaccredited Verbatim

First Instance: An opportunity to redo the piece to a maximum grade of 50%.

Subsequent Instance: A grade of zero. No opportunity to resubmit.

Full Plagiarism

First Instance: A grade of zero. No opportunity to resubmit.

Subsequent Instance: A grade zero. No opportunity to resubmit.

 

Online Code of Conduct

Virtute Innovation Academy provides online systems and resources for use by teachers and students. Online resources include all material that is accessed through a computer or telecommunications network. All policies, procedures, codes of behaviour, and rules of the Virtute Innovation Academy apply to those using online systems and resources provided by or on behalf of Virtute Innovation Academy.

 

The “Code of Online Conduct” pertains to the use of on-line systems and resources. This Code has been prepared to protect the rights and safety of all. Virtute Innovation Academy takes appropriate measures to ensure the security of the facilities and information that may be contained in them. Virtute Innovation Academy reserves the right to monitor the use of online resources by all who access the systems.

  • Personal Safety Rules: Never reveal information about your personal identity (such as your name, address, phone number, age, physical description or school) to strangers whom you may encounter online. Likewise, do not reveal such information in a public online forum where you may not know everyone who might see the information. Never reveal personal information online about someone else unless you have their prior permission and you know the information will not be used for harmful purposes. Never reveal your access password or that of anyone else. Never send a picture of yourself, another person or a group over an electronic network without prior informed permission of all the individuals involved and, in the case of minors, their parents or guardians. Report immediately to a teacher any message or request that you receive that bothers you or that suggests personal contact with you. Never publish the specific dates, times and locations of your whereabouts to people who are not directly entitled to such information or to public forums where unknown persons might access the information.

Unacceptable Sites and Materials: On a global network such as the Internet it is impossible to effectively control the content of the information. On occasion, users of online systems may encounter material that is controversial and which other users, parents or staff might consider inappropriate or offensive. It is the responsibility of the individual user not to intentionally access such material. If such material is accessed by accident, the incident must be reported immediately to a teacher or appropriate authority. Virtute Innovation Academy is committed to meeting obligations under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Ontario Human Rights Code by providing safe schools and workplaces that respect the rights of every individual. Discrimination and harassment will not be tolerated. It is not acceptable to use online systems to knowingly access sites, which contain material of a discriminatory or harassing nature. Users of the Virtute Innovation Academy On-line systems will not knowingly access, upload, download, store, display, distribute or publish any information that: is illegal or that advocates illegal acts or facilitates unlawful activity; threatens or intimidates any person or suggests violence, hatred or discrimination toward other people; uses inappropriate and/or abusive language or conduct; contains inappropriate religious or political messages; violates or infringes the rights of any other person according to Virtute Innovation Academy policies, Ministry of Education policies, the Ontario Human Rights Code, or the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms; is racially, culturally or religiously offensive; encourages the use of controlled substances, participation in an illegal act or uses the system to incite criminal actions; is of a defamatory, abusive, obscene, profane, pornographic or sexually explicit nature; contains personal information , images, or signatures of individuals without their prior informed consent; constitutes messages of sexual harassment or which contains inappropriate romantic overtones; solicits any users on behalf of any business or commercial organization without appropriate authorization; supports bulk mail, junk mail or “spamming”; propagates chain letters, or other e-mail debris; attempts to hide, disguise or misrepresent the identity of the sender.

 

Safe School Environment

A positive learning and teaching environment is essential if students are to succeed in school. Virtute Innovation Academy is committed to creating school learning environments that are caring, safe, peaceful, nurturing, positive, respectful and that enable all students to reach their full potential. When a school has a positive climate, all members of the school community feel safe, included, accepted and actively promote positive behaviours and interactions with each other. Virtute Innovation Academy will conduct a School Climate Surveys to hear directly from students, school staff and parents about how they view our school climate. The results of the survey will allow us to make informed planning decisions about programs to help prevent bullying and promote safe and inclusive schools.

 

Ministry of Education Policies and Procedures Website Links:

Promoting a Positive School Environment

Ontario’s Safe School Strategy

Shaping a Culture of Respect in Our Schools

Ontario’s Code of Conduct

Progressive Discipline

Caring and Safe Schools

The following processes have been put into place to create a safe school environment for the students:

  • Google Drive and Gmail are provided to all students for school functions but remain the property of Virtute Innovation Academy. Inappropriate electronic material is not permitted in Google Drive or Gmail. The school reserves the right to inspect a student’s Google Drive or Gmail, when and where the welfare of the school is involved.
  • All students are expected to treat other students, teachers and admin staff with respect, courtesy and consideration. Profanity will not be acceptable in any of the communication tools provided within the online courses.
  • All students will accept the authority of the teachers and all teachers will demonstrate respect for all students.
  • Threats, distasteful remarks, abuse of any kind, or harassment by any individual that impairs the health and welfare of any student or staff member is not permitted and is to be reported to the Virtute Innovation Academy Principal immediately.

The requirements for the OSSD, including:

Started Grade 9 On or After September 1, 1999

To graduate with an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) you must earn credits, participate in community involvement activities, and complete the provincial secondary school literacy requirement.

Credits Needed to Graduate

Students must earn the following compulsory credits to obtain the Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

18 compulsory credits

4

English (1 credit per grade)*

3

Mathematics (at least 1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)

2

Science

1

French as a Second Language

1

Canadian History

1

Canadian Geography

1

The Arts

1

Health and Physical Education

.5

Civics

.5

Career Studies

Plus ONE credit from each of these three groups:

1

Group 1: 1 additional credit in English or French as a Second Language**, or a Native language, or a classical or an international language, or social sciences and the humanities (family studies, philosophy, world religions), or Canadian and world studies, or guidance and career education, or cooperative education***

1

Group 2: 1 additional credit in health and physical education, or the arts, or business studies, or French as a Second Language**, or cooperative education***

1

Group 3: 1 additional credit in science (Grade 11 or 12) or technological education (Grades 9 to 12), or French as a Second Language**, or computer studies, or cooperative education***

 

Note: The following conditions apply to selections from the above three groups:

●       A maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language may count as additional compulsory credits, 1 credit from Group 1, and 1 credit from either Group 2 or Group 3.

●       A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education may count as additional compulsory credits, selected from any of Groups 1, 2, or 3.

*

The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) may be used to meet either the Grade 11 or the Grade 12 English compulsory credit requirement. The Grade 11 Contemporary Aboriginal Voices course may be used to meet the Grade 11 English compulsory credit requirement. For English language learners the requirement may be met through earning a maximum of 3 credits in English as a second language (ESL) or English literacy development (ELD); the fourth credit must be a Grade 12 compulsory English course.

*

The Grade 9 Expressing Aboriginal Cultures course may be used to meet the compulsory credit requirement in the arts.

*

Students who have taken Native languages in place of French as a second language in elementary school may use a Level 1 or 2 Native language course to meet the compulsory credit requirement for French as a second language.

In addition to the compulsory credits, students must:

 

earn 12 optional credits (courses you get to choose): The 12 optional credits may include up to 4 credits earned through approved dual credit courses.

Community involvement and literacy requirements

 

complete 40 hours of community involvement activities: Students who began secondary school during or after the 1999-2000 school year must complete a minimum of 40 hours community involvement activities as part of the diploma requirements. The purpose of this requirement is to encourage students to develop an awareness and understanding of civic responsibility, the role he or she can play, and the contribution he or she can make in supporting and strengthening communities. The VIA Principal will determine the number of hours of community service the mature student is required to complete, based on the grade level in which the student enrolls. Note: See subsection 7.4 below for more information.

 

complete the provincial literacy requirement: : If you entered Grade 9 in the 1999 – 2000 school year or in subsequent years, the student must successfully complete the Provincial Secondary School Literacy Requirement. This test, administered by EQAO, determines whether the student has acquired the reading and writing skills considered essential for literacy. It is based on the Ontario curriculum expectations for language and communication, particularly reading and writing, up to and including Grade 9. Note: See subsection 7.3 below for more information.

* A maximum of 3 credits in English as a Second Language (ESL) or English literacy development (ELD) may be counted towards the 4 compulsory credits in English, but the fourth must be a credit earned for a Grade 12 compulsory English course. ** In groups 1, 2, and 3, a maximum of 2 credits in French as a Second Language can count as compulsory credits, one from group 1 and one from either group 2 or group 3. ***A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education can count as compulsory credits. † The 12 optional credits may include up to 4 credits earned through approved dual credit courses. 2010

 

Substitution Credits

In order to allow flexibility in designing a student’s program and to ensure that all students can qualify for the OSSD or the OSSC, substitutions may be made for up to 3 compulsory credit courses using courses from the remaining courses offered by the school that meet the requirements for compulsory credits. Students who qualify under this substitute credit arrangement are those whose educational interests, in the opinion of their parents or guardians, or the VIA Principal, are best served by such substitution. In all cases, however, the sum of compulsory and optional credits will not be less than thirty for students aiming to earn the Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

The following are limitations on substitutions for compulsory credits:

  • English as a second language and English literacy development courses may not be used to substitute for a compulsory credit. (They may be used, however, to meet the compulsory credit requirements for three English credits in accordance with section OS 6.1.1.)
  • No more than one learning strategies course, from the guidance and career education curriculum policy document, may be used through substitution to meet a compulsory credit requirement.
  • Credits earned for cooperative education courses may not be used through substitution to meet compulsory credit requirements.
  • A locally developed compulsory credit (LDCC) course may not be used as a substitute for a compulsory credit; it may be used only to meet the compulsory credit requirement that it has been designed to meet.

Each substitution will be noted on the student’s Ontario Student Transcript.

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Requirement

If you entered Grade 9 in September 1999 or later and are working toward an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD), you must write the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). Students enrolled in Virtute Innovation Academy seeking an Ontario Secondary School Diploma will take the Secondary School Literacy Test in Grade 10. Students must pass the test in order to graduate, and their result is recorded on their Ontario School Transcript.

The Ontario Ministry of Education has mandated that the OSSLT be given to grade 10 students province-wide to determine if they can successfully demonstrate the reading and writing skills that apply to all subject areas in the provincial curriculum up to the end of grade 9.

The OSSLT is administered annually in the spring and is 2.5 hours in length. The OSSLT is designed, and its implementation is supervised by the Ontario Education and Accountability Office (EQAO).

 

Receiving an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) depends on passing the OSSLT. Students who are not successful on the test are able to attempt it again, in a future administration, or enroll in the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course OLC40.

 

Students with special needs may be permitted accommodations provided they have an Individual Education Plan (IEP). Students enrolled in ESL/ELD programs may be permitted special provisions or they may be deferred so that they write the OSSLT once they have a reasonable chance of success. Policies and guidelines regarding accommodations, deferrals, and exemptions are established and provided by EQAO.

Click here to go to the EQAO website for more information.

 

The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) is the usual method for assessing the literacy skills of students in Ontario for the purpose of determining whether they meet the provincial secondary school literacy requirement for graduation. The test thus identifies students who have demonstrated the required skills in literacy as well as those who have not demonstrated the required skills and will need to do further work. The test identifies the specific areas in which these latter students need remediation. The test is scheduled by and administered through the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) once each year, usually in the spring. Students will usually take the OSSLT in the school year following the school year in which they enter Grade 9. Students who do not successfully complete the OSSLT will have opportunities to retake the test in subsequent years, on dates scheduled by the EQAO.

Online Learning Graduation Requirement

Online learning graduation requirement

Beginning with the cohort of students who entered Grade 9 in the 2020-21 school year, all students must earn a minimum of two online learning credits as part of the requirements for an Ontario Secondary School Diploma unless they have been opted out or exempted in accordance with the processes described in this memorandum. Adult learners entering the Ontario secondary school system in 2023-24 or later will also be required to meet this graduation requirement unless they opt themselves out of the requirement in accordance with the processes described in this memorandum.

Students working towards other certificates (for example, the certificate of accomplishment or an Ontario Secondary School certificate) are not required to complete the online learning graduation requirement, yet may be encouraged to enroll in online learning courses to support the development of digital literacy and other important transferable skills that help prepare them for success after graduation and in all aspects of their lives.

 

Eligible credits

For the purposes of this Policy/Program Memorandum, online learning courses or online learning credits, also known as “e-learning” courses or credits, are Grades 9 to 12 credit courses that are delivered entirely using the internet and do not require students to be physically present with one another or with their educator in the school, except where they may be needed for:

  • examinations and other final evaluations
  • access to internet connectivity, learning devices, or other school-based supports (for example, academic, guidance, special education, mental health and well-being supports, and required initial assessment and in-person learning for English language learners and students of Actualisation linguistique en français (ALF) or Programme d’appui aux nouveaux arrivants (PANA) at their early stages of language acquisition)

Students must successfully complete the equivalent of at least two full online credits to fulfill the graduation requirement. Online learning credits towards the graduation requirement may be earned at any time during the student’s secondary school program or, under exceptional circumstances, an individual student in Grade 8, with parental consent, may be given permission by the principal of a secondary school to “reach ahead” to take secondary school courses, either during the school year or in the summer prior to entering Grade 9 (please refer to Ontario Schools, Kindergarten to Grade 12: Policy and Program Requirements for more information on these credits).

All online learning credits earned at a school authorized to offer credits towards an Ontario Secondary School Diploma may count towards the graduation requirement.

In online learning courses delivered by Ontario’s publicly funded secondary schools, coursework is teacher-led. The content is offered through a secure learning management system, allowing students and educators to communicate and share learning and coursework online. School boards may, for example, use the ministry’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) for this purpose, which is available for publicly funded school boards to use at no cost.

Students from the same online class may follow different timetables and be from different schools or school boards. In publicly funded secondary schools, students complete their online coursework with the support of a certified Ontario educator footnote 3[3] who provides instruction, ongoing feedback, assessment, evaluation, and reporting including implementing any accommodations and/or modifications identified in the student’s Individual Education Plan.

 

Ineligible credits

Credits that shall not count towards the online learning graduation requirement include those earned through:

  • in-person learning, in which students are physically present with other students in the same course and their educator in the school environment
  • blended learning, in which digital learning resources are used in an in-person learning setting, or in which students are taught part of the time in person in the school environment and part of the time online
  • flipped classrooms, a type of blended learning in which students are introduced to content online and practice working through it in person with their educator in the school environment
  • remote learning, characterized by minimum synchronous learning requirements, among other requirements as defined in Policy/Program Memorandum 164

 

The 40-hour Community Involvement Requirement

As part of the diploma requirements, you must complete a minimum of 40 hours of community involvement activities. These activities may be completed at any time while you earn your secondary school credits. This requirement is additional to the 30 credits needed for a high school diploma. Students who are the sole responsibility of Virtute Innovation Academy will be able to choose their own community involvement activities, within guidelines that will be provided by Virtute Innovation Academy. Students will be responsible for fulfilling this requirement on their own time, and for keeping a record of their activities on a tracking booklet supplied by the school. The student is required to submit the tracking document yearly, the data from which is placed on the OST to be kept in the student’s OSR. Students will provide documentation of completion of volunteer hours to the Principal of the school where the student’s OSR is held.

In order to promote community values by involving students in their community in a positive and contributive manner, students must complete the 40 hours of community activities outside of scheduled class time. Students are to select to do at least a total of 3 different community involvement activities and can only accumulate a total of a maximum of 8 hours for each selected and approved community involvement activity that are appropriate to their age, maturity and ability to complete their 40-hour Community Involvement Requirement. The student is not to partake in any activity in which the student’s safety will be compromised. Any activity NOT on the approved list must receive written approval of the Principal of Virtute Innovation Academy before beginning the activity.

Community Involvement Activities not approved:

The Ontario Ministry of Education has developed a list of activities that may not be chosen as community involvement activities. These are referred to as not approved and ineligible activities. Not approved and ineligible activities are:

 

  • Any paid activity (i.e. babysitting);
  • Cooperative education;
  • Any activities or programs organized by the school (i.e. cadets);
  • Playing on sport teams;
  • Any involving the operation of a motor vehicle or power tools or scaffolding;
  • Any involving in the administration of medications or medical procedures to another person;
  • Any occurring in an unsafe or unsupervised environment;
  • Any displacing a paid worker;
  • Any in a logging or mining environment if the student is under 16 years old;
  • Any in a factory, if the student is under 15 years of age;
  • Any taking place in a workplace other than a factory, if the student is under fourteen years of age and is not accompanied by an adult;
  • Any involving handling of substances classed as “designated substances” under the Occupational Health and Safety Act;
  • Any requiring the knowledge of a tradesperson whose trade is regulated by the provincial government;
  • Any involving banking or the handling of securities, or the handling of jewelry, works of art, antiques, or other valuables;
  • Any consisting of duties normally performed in the home (i.e. daily chores) or personal recreational activities;
  • Any involving activities for a court-ordered program (i.e. community-service program for young offenders, probationary program).

Community Involvement Activities approved:

  • Fundraising – includes non-profit organizations, canvassing, walk-a-thons, celebrity games, gift wrapping, gala events and sales for charitable purposes;
  • Sports/Recreation – includes coaching at the community level, helping to organize winter carnivals, parades and summer fairs;
  • Community Events – includes helping to organize special meets and games, and volunteering as a leisure buddy or pool assistant;
  • Community Projects – includes participating in organized food drives, or support services for community groups;
  • Environmental Projects – includes participating in community clean-ups, flower/tree planting, recycling and general beautification projects and activities;
  • Volunteer Work with Seniors – includes assisting at seniors’ residences (e.g. serving snacks, helping with activities or portering, or participating in visiting and reading programs);
  • Committee Work – includes participation on advisory boards, neighbourhood associations and regional associations;
  • Religious Activities – includes participation as a volunteer in programs for children, child minding, Sunday School assistance, special events and clerical tasks;
  • Church activities such as helping to teach Sunday school, bazaars, etc.
  • Youth Programs – includes volunteer assistance with the operation of youth programs such as 4H, Scouts, Guides, drop-in centres, breakfast programs, March Break programs, Leaders in Training, summer playground activities and camps;
  • Office/Clerical Work – includes volunteer activity in reception, computer work and mailings for individuals or groups providing charitable or general community benefit;
  • Work with Animals – includes volunteer involvement with animal care, horseback riding programs, or volunteer assistance at a local zoo or petting farm;
  • Arts and Culture – includes volunteer assistance at a gallery, performing arts production or program, or in a community library program;
  • Activities for Individuals – includes any volunteer activity that assists someone who requires assistance for shopping, tutoring, light snow removal (no use of snow blower), housekeeping, writing letters or transcribing, or involves; hospital visitation, voluntary involvement with chronic care, or service as a volunteer reading buddy, Picking up & dropping off groceries, mail, or other goods for a neighbour.- Simply have them send their list through text, leave the goods at the door, then have them e-transfer you the total;
  • Organize a clothing drive in your neighbourhood. You can design & distribute flyers; have neighbours leave their clothes in a sealed bag on their doorstep; wear gloves & arrange to drop them off at a local clothing donation bin)
  • School Community Service – may include service within the school community that provides benefit to others that takes place outside the regular school day. The school Principal in advance of the commencement of the activity must approve these school-based activities in advance.

Community Involvement Activities approved and suggested with health and safety purposes in mind during COVID-19 pandemic times (if required and necessary only under the guidance and instructions given by the Ministry of Education):

The temporary changes include waiving a number of policy restrictions, as follows, at the Principal’s discretion:
1. Schools may allow students to earn hours during the time allotted for the instructional program on a school day;
2. Schools may allow students to earn hours through duties normally performed in the home; and
3. Schools may allow students aged 14 years and older to count up to a maximum of 10 hours from paid employment towards their earned hours. Students counting paid employment towards their graduation requirement will be required to complete a reflection exercise indicating how their work contributed to the service for others.

Virtual Volunteering opportunities:

For students still looking to earn their hours, without compromising on safety, there are still plenty of opportunities available – virtually. To help you discover these opportunities, we’ve compiled a list of resources you can search to find ones that fit your interests. We have also suggested some ideas of contact-less activities and projects to help you earn those all-important hours and make a difference in your local community.

Volunteer Your Time to People You Know:

These are just a few ideas. Think about the skills you have and who in your extended circle may benefit from your sharing. Are you musically inclined? Offer your time and expertise to someone less rhythmically-fortunate who’s looking to learn. Perhaps you’ve perfected to art of baking bread – congratulations on your culinary feat! Rather than simply sharing your recipe online, hop on your favourite video app and walk a friend through your baking process step-by-step! Or think big and plan a long-distance project.

As long as you have someone to confirm the time you’ve spent and you are not collecting any money for the service you provide, chances are it’ll work. Of course, we advise confirming with your Guidance Counsellor and Principal ahead of time to ensure the project you have in mind will meet the required criteria.

Some suggested Virtual Volunteer opportunities in Canada:

Visit the Ontario Volunteer Centre Network to find opportunities through a centre in your community:

http://ovcn.ca/volunteering

http://ovcn.ca/volunteering/find-my-volunteer-centre

College Transitions: Online / Virtual Volunteer Opportunities for High School Students

https://www.collegetransitions.com/blog/virtual-volunteer-opportunities-for-high-school-students/

https://www.collegetransitions.com/blog/virtual-volunteer-opportunities-for-high-school-students/

Canada: https://volunteer.ca/index.php?MenuItemID=422
Toronto: https://www.volunteertoronto.ca/networking/opening_search.asp
Peel: https://volunteermbc.org/index.php
Waterloo: https://volunteerwr.ca/
London: https://pillarnonprofit.ca/volunteer
Ottawa: https://www.volunteerottawa.ca/

For even more volunteer opportunities, check out the Toronto Public Library’s volunteer page (https://torontopubliclibrary.typepad.com/teens/volunteer.html).

More Virtual Volunteering opportunities:

  • 40 Online Community Involvement and Service Ideas approved and suggested that may align effectively with a student’s personal passionate interest and goals and that may make a positive impact to a student’s university and college application process:

Along with strong grades and excellent test scores, many university and college admissions offices are also looking for students with robust resumes of extracurricular activities. An easy way to build up your portfolio of extracurriculars is with community service—but with face-to-face volunteer opportunities limited these days, you might be wondering how to find community service opportunities online.

Luckily, there are tons of great organizations looking for high school students with interest in performing online community service. Here are 37 online community involvement and service opportunities to consider.

Health

  1. Be My Eyes

https://www.bemyeyes.com/

Be My Eyes is a great way for students interested in the health industry to get community service hours online. It connects volunteers with blind and low-vision people through a video app to provide visual assistance with everything from checking expiration dates to distinguishing colors to reading instructions.  

  1. 2. American Red Cross

https://www.redcross.org/volunteer/become-a-volunteer/urgent-need-for-volunteers.html

From providing blood collection support to serving on the Disaster Action Team, the American Red Cross has tons of virtual volunteer opportunities available to high school students.

  1. Love For Our Elders

https://loveforourelders.org/letters

 Many elderly people suffer from loneliness, as current Yale student Jacob Cramer discovered while volunteering at his local senior living community, with several residents telling him that he was their only visitor. He started Love For Our Elders as a result, which gathers letters for seniors who need encouragement. Students can earn verified volunteer hours by writing letters, starting a chapter at their school, or hosting a letter drive.

Language

  1. Translators Without Borders

https://translatorswithoutborders.org/volunteer/

Translators Without Borders is perfect for students who have fluency in a second language. Volunteers can perform online community service by translating texts for a variety of international organizations focused on crisis relief, health, and education. To date, the organization has translated more than 80 million words! 

  1. Tarjimly

https://tarjimly.org/howitworks

Tarjimly is an app that allows students to put their second-language skills to work by providing on-demand translation services for refugees, asylees, and immigrants. 

  1. Distributed Proofreaders

 https://www.pgdp.net/c/

Distributed Proofreaders has the audacious goal of creating the world’s largest digital library, and their current collection contains over 60,000 free books. This program needs volunteer proofreaders as they continue to build their library. 

  1. Bookshare

https://www.bookshare.org/cms/get-involved/volunteer/opportunities-us

Bookshare focuses on making reading more accessible to people with reading barriers such as dyslexia, learning disabilities, visual impairments, and physical disabilities. With a library of more than 900,000 titles, Bookshare needs volunteers to scan in new books and proofread scanned files as they continue to improve their collection. 

 

  1. TED Translators

https://www.ted.com/participate/translate

TED Translators is a community of volunteers who add subtitles to TED Talks, so that the inspiring ideas shared in each video can spread around the globe! Students can offer translation or transcription services in over one hundred languages.

Education

  1. School on Wheels

 https://schoolonwheels.org/digital-learning-initiative/

School on Wheels is another great tutoring opportunity for volunteers aged 16 to 18 living in Southern California. Volunteers work with students living in shelters, motels, vehicles, group foster homes, and on the streets and play a small role in overcoming an enormous problem—one in twenty children in California are homeless. Volunteers work digitally with students ranging from kindergarten to 12th grade.

  1. Learn to Be

 https://www.learntobe.org/apply

Learn to Be is another nonprofit tutoring platform where students can volunteer their time to tutor an elementary, middle school, or high school student one-on-one with the subjects they need help with most.

  1. Learning Ally

https://learningally.org/Get-Involved/Volunteer-Opportunities

Learning Ally is a nonprofit organization that offers high-quality audiobooks and learning solutions for struggling readers from kindergarten through high school. Volunteers can use their voices to become the narrator of audiobooks to help students overcome obstacles in education. 

  1. Science Buddies

https://www.sciencebuddies.org/about/how-to-volunteer

Science Buddies is a program where students and parents can ask volunteers questions about science questions for kindergarten, elementary, middle school, and high school-aged students. This is a great opportunity for high school students who love science!

 

Technology 

  1. Teenangels

http://www.teenangels.org/about/what_is_teenangels.html

Teenangels is an awesome opportunity for students ages 13 to 18 who dream of having a job in cybersecurity, or are simply interested in computers. Teenangels volunteers run programs in schools that teach teachers, parents, and kids about the responsible and safe use of the internet—they’ve even presented before Congress!  

  1. Mozilla

https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/contribute/

You might not have known, but Mozilla, the organization behind the popular web browser Firefox, is a nonprofit and is always looking for volunteer help. Computer-savvy high schoolers can perform online community service, helping with everything from programming to design to testing. 

  1. Donate:Code

https://www.donatecode.com/

High school students with coding skills can build their portfolios, sharpen their skills, and help out the causes they care about. Donate:Code connects charities and community groups to people willing to donate their time and skills.  

  1. DemocracyLab

https://www.democracylab.org/projects

DemocracyLab helps connect technology projects that better society with skilled volunteers. Students with experience working with technology can volunteer with tons of tech-for-good projects to benefit various industries, including civil infrastructure, education, and the environment.

  1. TechSoup

https://www.techsoup.org/joining-techsoup/become-a-volunteer

TechSoup allows high school students to share their technology tips and advice in forums. The nonprofit sector uses this information to implement technology more effectively within their companies to have a greater reach in their communities. 

 

History

  1. Citizen Archivist

https://www.archives.gov/citizen-archivist

Students with interest in history can volunteer with Citizen Archivist to help the National Archives preserve and share the public records detailing the story of our nation and its people. Volunteers are needed to transcribe, tag, and add comments to make them more accessible and searchable.

  1. Citizen Scholar

https://www.si.edu/volunteer/DigitalVolunteers

Citizen Scholar is an interesting online community service opportunity for history buffs who would like to work with the Smithsonian Institute, the world’s largest museum and research complex. This organization assists in the transcription of historic documents and papers of prominent Americans, along with records from the Smithsonian’s scientific collection to make them more accessible to researchers and the public. 

  1. By The People

https://crowd.loc.gov/

By the People is a virtual volunteer opportunity where volunteers can help transcribe important documents belonging to the Library of Congress. Students can create and review transcriptions to help people search for, access, and find these historical documents.

  1. Ancestry.com

https://blogs.ancestry.com/worldarchivesproject/?page_id=1023

Ancestry.com works with volunteers to index stories and history that would otherwise be lost. High school students who are passionate about genealogy can volunteer to help others discover their personal history.

Humanitarian

  1. Amnesty Decoders

https://decoders.amnesty.org/

Amnesty Decoders provides a platform for volunteers to perform online community service by using their computers and phones to comb through pictures, documents, and other information to expose human rights projects. Projects include everything from finding tweets abusive to women to locating vulnerable villages in Darfur.

  1. Missing Maps

https://www.missingmaps.org/

Missing Maps is a collaborative project to create maps for unmapped communities of the world who are likely to suffer from disasters and crises. Volunteers can trace satellite imagery, add neighborhoods and street names, and more to help humanitarian teams and first responders reach these communities.

  1. Humanitarian Data Exchange

https://data.humdata.org/

Humanitarian Data Exchange is an organization that organizes humanitarian data in one place. Virtual volunteers can add this information to a database to be easily accessed by those who need it.

  1. Naburr

https://orgs.tigweb.org/nabuur

Nabuur offers virtual volunteer opportunities for high school students by linking them to villages in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Together, they collaborate and share ideas to solve local issues.

  1. Crisis Text Hotline

https://www.crisistextline.org/become-a-volunteer/

The Crisis Text Hotline is a confidential intervention hotline that handles texts from people struggling with anxiety, depression, eating disorders, suicide, or self-harm. Volunteers must complete 30 hours of virtual crisis management training before starting in this position.

  1. Change.org

https://www.change.org/start-a-petition

Do you have humanitarian or social causes you strongly believe in? Start a petition on Change.org to build support for your cause and change the world!

 

 

Social

  1. Adopt a Nursing Home

https://www.adoptanursinghome.com/

Nursing home residents are struggling with their emotional and mental health, as they can no longer receive visitors. A solution from the Texas Health Care Association, Adopt a Nursing Home, connects volunteers with residents (and staff) and provides the ability to send online messages and physical letters to help keep spirits high. 

  1. Operation Gratitude

https://www.operationgratitude.com/volunteer/anywhere/letters/

Put your pen to work, flex your writing skills, and show your support for first responders, troops, and veterans. Operation Gratitude collects thank-you letters from “regular” people and sends them to those serving our country. 

  1. The Trevor Project

https://www.thetrevorproject.org/volunteer/

The Trevor Project is a program for students over age 18 who want to provide a safe online space for LGBTQ youth, ages 13 to 24. Volunteers from all backgrounds are welcome. Program members have improved the well-being of thousands of young people since the project’s founding in 1998. 

  1. Best Buddies

https://www.bestbuddies.org/2020/04/21/online-friendships/

Best Buddies is dedicated to enhancing the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. They’re looking for volunteers for their e-Buddies program—a commitment to email at least once every two weeks. Participants are matched to a buddy based on interest, games, and location (people living in the same state aren’t matched), making this a great way to make a new friend, make a person feel more included, and volunteer.

  1. Girls Inc.

https://girlsinc.org/take-action/social-media-ambassador/

Even students with only limited time can carve out time to volunteer for Girls Inc.—just five minutes a week. As a social media ambassador, you can help amplify the organization’s message by creating and sharing social posts focused on teaching girls how to navigate economic and social barriers and helping them grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

  1. Humane Society

https://volunteers.humanesociety.org/index.php?section=volunteerOpportunities&action=view&fwID=626

While many animal lovers would love to volunteer at their local shelter or foster an animal, it’s not always feasible. Luckily, there are still ways to give back, one of which is volunteering for the Humane Society’s phone bank. In this position, students over the age of 16 will place phone calls to support the organization’s legislative priorities and ballot initiatives. 

  1. Sierra Club

https://addup.sierraclub.org/

The Sierra Club empowers teens and young adults to fight for environmental justice issues. You can volunteer and take action by joining one (or more!) of the campaigns listed on their website.

  1. Hire Heroes USA

https://www.hireheroesusa.org/volunteer/

Hire Heroes USA helps veterans find job opportunities. Virtual volunteers can assist with interviews, career counseling, and guiding people with the application process.

  1. Vollie

https://www.vollie.com.au/

Do you have a unique skill? Vollie is an online platform that matches skilled volunteers to non-profits and charities, like Habitat for Humanity and Cancer Council, that need help in a particular area of expertise.

Ontario Secondary School Certificate

The Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) will be granted, on request, to students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. To be granted an OSSC, a student must have earned a minimum of 14 credits, distributed as follows.

 

Compulsory Credits (total of 7)

  • 2 credits in English
  • 1 credit in Canadian geography OR Canadian history
  • 1 credit in mathematics
  • 1 credit in science
  • 1 credit in health and physical education
  • 1 credit in the arts, computer studies or technological education

 

Optional Credits (total of 7)

  • 7 credits selected by the student from available courses

 

Note: The Principal, to better serve a student’s educational interest, and in consultation with the parent, may replace up to three courses with courses meeting the requirement for compulsory credits. Either the Principal or the parent my initiate the process. The total of compulsory and optional credits will still not be less than 14 for granting an OSSC. The substitution will be noted on the OST.

 

Certificate of Accomplishment

Students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certificate may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment. The Certificate of Accomplishment may be a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to take certain kinds of further training, or who plan to find employment directly after leaving school. The Certificate of Accomplishment is to be accompanied by the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. For students who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP), a copy of the IEP may be included. Students who return to school to complete additional credit and noncredit courses (including courses with modified or alternative expectations in special education programs) will have their transcript updated accordingly, but will not be issued a new Certificate of Accomplishment. The Ontario Secondary School Diploma or Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted when the returning student has fulfilled the appropriate requirements.

The definition of a credit

The Ontario secondary school program is based on a credit system. Full credit courses are 110 hours in length. A credit is granted by the Principal on behalf of the Ministry of Education in recognition of the successful completion of the expectations of a 110-hour course that has been developed or approved by the Ministry of Education.

definitions of the types of courses available in the Ontario curriculum

The curriculum is organized into several types of courses, intended to enable students to choose courses suited to their strengths, interests, and goals. The following three types of courses are offered in Grades 9 and 10:

  1. Academic courses develop students’ knowledge and skills through the study of theory and abstract problems. These courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and explore related concepts as well. They incorporate practical applications as appropriate. The code of an academic course ends with the letter “D”, ie CHC2D
  2. Applied courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and develop students’ knowledge and skills through practical applications and concrete examples. Familiar situations are used to illustrate ideas, and students are given more opportunities to experience hands-on applications of the concepts and theories they study. The code of an applied course ends with the letter “P”, ie ENG1P
  3. Open courses, which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college, or the workplace in mind. The code of an open course ends with the letter “O”, ie BTT2O

an explanation of the course coding system

The common course code of all courses consists both of a five code character and a course title component, as designated by the Ministry of Education and Training in Ontario:

For example: MPM1D a, Principles of Mathematics

MPM

1

D

a

Course Descriptor

Grade of Course

Course Type

School Code

Math

Principles

Math

●       “1” = Grade 9

●       “2” = Grade 10

●       “3” = Grade 11

●       “4” = Grade 12

●       D – Academic

●       P – Applied

●       O – Open

●       U – University

●       C – College

●       M – College/University

 

Descriptions of all courses offered by the school, including courses that are not part of the Ontario curriculum, such as locally developed courses (compulsory and optional)

Grades 9 and 10 courses

Students choose between academic and applied courses in each of the core subjects – English, French as a second language, mathematics, science, geography, and history.

Academic courses

Academic courses develop a student’s knowledge base and skills through the study of theory and abstract problems. These courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and explore related concepts as well. They incorporate practical applications as appropriate.

Applied courses

Applied courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject, and develop a student’s knowledge base and skills through practical applications and concrete examples. Familiar situations are used to illustrate ideas, and students are given more opportunities to experience hands-on applications of the concepts and theories they study.

Open courses

Open course are the only type of course offered in most subjects other than those listed above. They are designed to prepare students for further study in a subject, and to enrich their education generally. Open courses comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students.

Students in Grades 9 and 10, along with their parents or guardians will make the choice between academic, applied or open courses primarily on the basis of their strengths, interests, and needs. The Principal, guidance counseling team, and teachers are here to assist the student in making his or her choice of course selection. Students who are successful in any academic or applied course in Grade 9 will have the opportunity to enter either the academic or applied course in the same subject in Grade 10. Grade 10 courses do have prerequisite requirements. Grade 10 academic courses prepare students for Grade 11 University or College preparation courses; Grade 10 applied courses prepare students for Grade 11 College or Workplace preparation courses.

English as a Second Language (ESL)

ESL, level 1, Open (ESLAO)

COURSE Description

Course Title: English as a Second Language

Course Code: ESLAO

Grade:

Course Type: Open

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite:

Development:

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/esl912currb.pdf

Department: English

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Lidia Petrone

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course builds on students’ previous education and language knowledge to introduce them to the English language and help them adjust to the diversity in their new environment. Students will use beginning English language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for everyday and essential academic purposes. They will engage in short conversations using basic English language structures and simple sentence patterns; read short adapted texts; and write phrases and short sentences. The course also provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to begin to adapt to their new lives in Canada.

 

English as a Second Language (ESL)

ESL, level 2, Open (ESLBO)

COURSE Description

Course Title: English as a Second Language

Course Code: ESLBO

Grade:

Course Type: Open

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: ESLAO, English as a Second Language, Level 1, Open or equivalent

Development:

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/esl912currb.pdf

Department: English

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Lidia Petrone

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course extends students’ listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in English for everyday and academic purposes. Students will participate in conversations in structured situations on a variety of familiar and new topics; read a variety of texts designed or adapted for English language learners; expand their knowledge of English grammatical structures and sentence patterns; and link English sentences to compose paragraphs. The course also supports students’ continuing adaptation to the Ontario school system by expanding their knowledge of diversity in their new province and country.

English as a Second Language (ESL)

ESL, level 3, Open (ESLCO):

COURSE Description

Course Title: English as a Second Language

Course Code: ESLCO

Grade:

Course Type: Open

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: ESLBO

Curriculum Policy Document: English as a Second Language and English Literacy Development:

 http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/esl912currb.pdf

Department: English

Development Date: 2023

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Lidia Petrone

Course Description:

This course further extends students’ skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English for a variety of everyday and academic purposes. Students will make short classroom oral presentations; read a variety of adapted and original texts in English; and write using a variety of text forms. As well, students will expand their academic vocabulary and their study skills to facilitate their transition to the mainstream school program. This course also introduces students to the rights and responsibilities inherent in Canadian citizenship, and to a variety of current Canadian issues.

English as a Second Language (ESL)

ESL, level 4, Open (ESLDO):

COURSE Description

Course Title: English as a Second Language

Course Code: ESLDO

Grade:

Course Type: Open

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: ESLCO

Curriculum Policy Document: English as a Second Language and English Literacy Development

 http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/esl912currb.pdf

Department: English

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Lidia Petrone

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course prepares students to use English with increasing fluency and accuracy in classroom and social situations and to participate in Canadian society as informed citizens. Students will develop the oral-presentation, reading, and writing skills required for success in all school subjects. They will extend listening and speaking skills through participation in discussions and seminars; study and interpret a variety of grade-level texts; write narratives, articles, and summaries in English; and respond critically to a variety of print and media texts.

English as a Second Language (ESL)

ESL, level 5, Open (ESLEO)

COURSE Description

Course Title: English as a Second Language

Course Code: ESLEO

Grade:

Course Type: Open

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: ESLDO

Curriculum Policy Document: English as a Second Language and English Literacy Development

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/esl912currb.pdf

Department: English

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Lidia Petrone

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course provides students with the skills and strategies they need to make the transition to college and university preparation courses in English and other secondary school disciplines. Students will be encouraged to develop independence in a range of academic tasks. They will participate in debates and lead classroom workshops; read and interpret literary works and academic texts; write essays, narratives, and reports; and apply a range of learning strategies and research skills effectively. Students will further develop their ability to respond critically to print and media texts.

 

English

COURSE description

COURSE Title: English (2023)

COURSE Code: ENL1W

Grade: 9

Course Type: De-streamed

Credit value: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

Curriculum Policy Document: English, 2007 The Ontario Curriculum Grades 9 and 10 (https://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/english910currb.pdf)

Department: English

Course developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Lidia Petrone

Development date: 2023

Course description:

This course enables students to continue to develop and consolidate the foundational knowledge and skills that they need for reading, writing, and oral and visual communication. Throughout the course, students will continue to enhance their media literacy and critical literacy skills, and to develop and apply transferable skills, including digital literacy. Students will also make connections to their lived experiences and to society and increase their understanding of the importance of language and literacy across the curriculum.

 

Computer Studies

COURSE description

COURSE Title: Digital Technology and Innovations in the Changing World (2023)

COURSE Code: ICD20

Grade: 10

Course Type: Open

Credit Value: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

Curriculum Policy Document: Computer Studies, 2008 The Ontario Curriculum Grades 10 to 12 (https://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/computer10to12_2008.pdf)

Department: Computer Studies

Course developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online

Development date: 2023

Course description:

This course helps students develop cutting-edge digital technology and computer programming skills that will support them in contributing to and leading the global economic, scientific and societal innovations of tomorrow. Students will learn and apply coding concepts and skills to build hands-on projects and investigate artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, and other emerging digital technologies that connect to a wide range of fields and careers. Using critical thinking skills with a focus on digital citizenship, students will investigate the appropriate use and development of the digital technologies that they encounter every day, as well as the benefits and limitations of these technologies.

Grades 11 and 12 Courses

At Virtute Innovation Academy Grade 11 and 12 students will choose from among destination-related course types: university preparation, university/college preparation, college preparation, and open courses. Students will make their choices based on their interest, achievement, and career goals. Prerequisites are specified for many of the courses offered in Grades 11 and 12. These prerequisites are identified in the Course of Study document for each course. The following four types of courses are offered by Virtute Innovation Academy in Grades 11 and 12:

  1. College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for most college programs or for admission to specific apprenticeship or other training programs. The code of a college preparation course ends with the letter “C”, ie MBF3C
  2. University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs. The code of a university preparation course ends with the letter “U”, ie SCH3U
  3. University / college preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific programs offered at universities and colleges. The code of an university / college preparation course ends with the letter “M”, ie MCF3M
  4. Open courses, which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college, or the workplace in mind. The code of an open course ends with the letter “O”, ie EMS3O

Prerequisite Courses

Courses in Grades 10, 11, and 12 often require the student to have completed a prerequisite course. All prerequisite courses are identified in curriculum policy documents published by the Ministry of Education, and no course apart from these may be identified as prerequisites. Any school operating in Ontario must provide parents and students with clear and accurate information about prerequisites. If a parent or an adult student (a student who is eighteen years of age or older) requests that a prerequisite be waived, the Virtute Innovation Academy Principal will determine whether or not the prerequisite should be waived. The Principal may also initiate consideration of whether a prerequisite should be waived. The Principal will make his or her decision in consultation with the student, the appropriate school staff and the parent or guardian.

 

  1. Canadian and World Studies

COURSE description

COURSE Title: Civics and Citizenship

Course Code: CVH20

Grade: 10

Course Type: University Preparation

Credit Value: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

Curriculum Policy Document: 2013 Canadian and World Studies, Ontario Curriculum Grades 9 and 10, Geography, History, Civics (Politics)

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/canworld910curr2013.pdf

Department: Canadian and World Studies

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. You will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing your understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. You will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to you.

 

  1. MCR3U – Functions

COURSE description

Course Title: Functions

Course Code: MCR3U

Grade: 11

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: MPM2D, Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic

Curriculum Policy Document: Mathematics, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007

Department: Mathematics

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Albert Jiang

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

 

  1. SCH3U – Chemistry

COURSE description

Course Title: Chemistry

Course Code: SCH3U

Grade: 11

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: SNC2D, Science, Grade 10, Academic

Curriculum Policy Document: Science, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2008

Department: Science

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Albert Jiang

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.

 

  1. SBI3U – Biology

COURSE description

Course Title: Biology

Course Code: SBI3U

Grade: 11

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: SNC2D, Science, Grade 10, Academic

Curriculum Policy Document: Science, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2008

Department: Science

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity; evolution; genetic processes; the structure and function of animals; and the anatomy, growth, and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study, and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation.

 

5. SPH3U – Physics

COURSE description

Course Title: Physics

Course Code: SPH3U

Grade: 11

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: SNC2D, Science, Grade 10, Academic

Curriculum Policy Document: Science, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2008

Department: Science

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Albert Jiang

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion; different kinds of forces; energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and sound; and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyze the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

 

  1. ENG3U – English

COURSE description

Course Title: English

Course Code: ENG3U

Grade: 11

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: ENG2D, English, Grade 10, Academic

Curriculum Policy Document: English, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007

Department: English

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Lidia Petrone

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyze challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course.

 

  1. AVI3M – Visual Arts

COURSE description

Course Title: Visual Arts

Course Code: AVI3M

Grade: 11

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: Visual Arts, Grade 9 or 10, Open (AVI10 or AVI20)

Curriculum Policy Document:

The Arts, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2010 (Revised) http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/arts1112curr2010.pdf

Department: The Arts

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Anson Liaw

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course enables students to further develop their knowledge and skills in visual arts and prepare for University entry. Students will use the creative process to explore a wide range of themes through studio work that may include drawing, painting, sculpting, and printmaking, as well as the creation of collage, or multimedia works and works. Students will use the critical analysis process when evaluating their own work and the works of others. The course may be delivered as a comprehensive program or through a program focused on a particular art form (e.g. Photography, video, computer graphics, information design.)

 

  1. ASM3M – Media Arts

COURSE description

Course Title: Media Arts

Course Code: ASM3M

Grade: 11

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: Media Arts, Grade 10, Open

Curriculum Policy Document:

The Arts, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2010 (Revised) http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/arts1112curr2010.pdf

Department: The Arts

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Anson Liaw

Development Date: 2023

            Course Description:

This course focuses on the further development of media arts skills through the production

of art works involving traditional and emerging technologies, tools, and techniques

such as new media, computer animation, and web environments. Students will explore

the evolution of media arts as an extension of traditional art forms, use the creative process

to produce effective media artworks, and critically analyse the unique characteristics of this art form. Students will examine the role of media artists in shaping audience perceptions of identity, culture, and values.

 

  1. AWQ3M – Visual Arts: Photography

COURSE description

Course Title: Visual Arts: Photography

Course Code: AWQ3M

Grade: 11

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: AWQ20 Visual Arts Photography, Grade 10

Curriculum Policy Document:

The Arts, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2010 (Revised) http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/arts1112curr2010.pdf

Department: The Arts

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

Students will use the creative process to explore a wide range of themes through studio work and art history of photography, photography techniques and research that may include some drawing, Photography, 3D photography, Art Installations, and some mixed-media works. Students will use the critical analysis process when evaluating their own work and the work of others. The course may be delivered as a comprehensive program.

 

  1. SCH4U – Chemistry

COURSE description

Course Title: Chemistry

Course Code: SCH4U

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: SCH3U, Chemistry, Grade 11, University

Curriculum Policy Document: Science, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2008

Department: Science

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Albert Jiang

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, energy changes and rates of reaction, chemical systems and equilibrium, electrochemistry, and atomic and molecular structure. Students will further develop problem-solving and laboratory skills as they investigate chemical processes, at the same time refining their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in daily life, and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

 

 

  1. SBI4U – Biology

COURSE description

Course Title: Biology

Course Code: SBI4U

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: SBI3U, Biology, Grade 11, University

Curriculum Policy Document: Science, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2008

Department: Science

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes associated with biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on achievement of the detailed knowledge and refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields.

 

  1. SPH4U – Physics

COURSE description

Course Title: Physics

Course Code: SPH4U

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: SPH3U, Physics, Grade 11, University

Curriculum Policy Document: Science, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2008

Department: Science

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Albert Jiang

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyze, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

 

  1. MCV4U – Calculus and Vectors

COURSE description

Course Title: Calculus and Vectors

Course Code: MCV4U

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: MHF4U, Advanced Functions, Grade 12, University (may be taken concurrently)

Curriculum Policy Document: Mathematics, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007

Department: Mathematics

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Albert Jiang

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course.

 

  1. MDM4U – Mathematics of Data Management

COURSE description

Course Title: Mathematics of Data Management

Course Code: MDM4U

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: MCR3U, Functions, Grade 11, University or MCF3M, Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University/College

Curriculum Policy Document: Mathematics, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007

Department: Mathematics

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Albert Jiang

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analyzing large amounts of information; apply counting techniques, probability, and statistics in modelling and solving problems; and carry out a data management investigation that integrates the expectations of the course and encourages perseverance and independence. Students planning to pursue university programs in business, the social sciences, or the humanities will find this course of particular interest.

 

  1. MHF4U – Advanced Functions

COURSE description

Course Title: Advanced Functions

Course Code: MHF4U

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: MCR3U, Functions, Grade 11, University or MCT4C, Mathematics for College Technology, Grade 12, College

Curriculum Policy Document: Mathematics, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007

Department: Mathematics

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Albert Jiang

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.

 

  1. ENG4U – English

COURSE description

Course Title: English

Course Code: ENG4U

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: ENG3U, English, Grade 11, University

Curriculum Policy Document: English, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007

Department: English

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Lidia Petrone

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyze a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

 

  1. LKBCU – Simplified Chinese

COURSE description

Course Title: Simplified Chinese

Course Code: LKBCU

Grade: 11

Course Type: Open

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Curriculum Policy Document: Classical Studies and International Languages, The Ontario Curriculum Grades 9 to 12, REVISED http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/classiclang912curr.pdf

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Amanda He

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course provides extended opportunities for students to communicate and interact in the language of study in a variety of social and academic contexts. Students will define and enhance their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, as well as their creative and critical thinking skills, as they explore and respond to a variety of oral and written texts, including complex authentic and adapted texts. They will also broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities where the language is spoken, and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

 

  1. LKBDU – Simplified Chinese

COURSE description

Course Title: Simplified Chinese

Course Code: LKBDU

Grade: 12

Course Type: Open

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

Curriculum Policy Document: Classical Studies and International Languages, The Ontario Curriculum Grades 9 to 12, REVISED http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/classiclang912curr.pdf

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Amanda He

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course provides extended opportunities for students to communicate and interact in the language of study in a variety of social and academic contexts. Students will refine and enhance their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, as well as their creative and critical thinking skills, as they explore and respond to a variety of oral and written texts, including complex authentic and adapted texts. They will also broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities where the language is spoken, and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

 

  1. AVI4M – Visual Arts

COURSE description

Course Title: Visual Arts

Course Code: AVI4M

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: Visual Arts, Grade 11 (AVI3M)

Curriculum Policy Document:

The Arts, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2010 (Revised) http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/arts1112curr2010.pdf

Department: The Arts

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Anson Liaw

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course focuses on enabling students to refine their use of the creative process when creating and presenting two- and three-dimensional art works using a variety of traditional and emerging media and technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process to deconstruct art works and explore connections between art and society. The studio program enables students to explore a range of materials, processes, and techniques that can be applied in their own art production. Students will also make connections between various works of art in personal, contemporary, historical, and cultural contexts.

 

  1. ASM4M – Media Arts

COURSE description

COURSE Title: Media Arts

Course Code: ASM4M

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: Media Arts, Grade 11 (ASM3M)

Curriculum Policy Document:

The Arts, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2010 (Revised) http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/arts1112curr2010.pdf

Department: The Arts

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Anson Liaw

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course emphasizes the refinement of media arts skills through the creation of a

thematic body of work by applying traditional and emerging technologies, tools, and

techniques such as multimedia, computer animation, installation art, and performance art.

Students will develop works that express their views on contemporary issues and will

create portfolios suitable for use in either career or postsecondary education applications.

Students will critically analyze the role of media artists in shaping audience perceptions

of identity, culture, and community values.

  1. AWQ4M – Visual Arts: Photography

COURSE description

Course Title: Visual Arts: Photography

Course Code: AWQ4M

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: Visual Arts: AWQ3M Photography, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

Curriculum Policy Document:

The Arts, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2010 (Revised) http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/arts1112curr2010.pdf

Department: The Arts

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course focuses on enabling students to refine their use of the creative process when creating and presenting two- and three-dimensional art works using a variety of traditional and emerging media and technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process to deconstruct art works and explore connections between art and society. The studio program enables students to explore a range of materials, processes, and techniques that can be applied in their own photography. Students will also make connections between various works of art in personal, contemporary, historical, and cultural contexts.

 

  1. BOH4M – Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals

COURSE description

COURSE Title: Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals

Course Code: BOH4M

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

Curriculum Policy Document:

The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: Business Studies, (2006-Revised)

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/business1112currb.pdf

Department: Business Studies

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course focuses on the development of leadership skills used in managing a successful business. Students will analyse the role of a leader in business, with a focus on decision making, management of group dynamics, workplace stress and conflict, motivation of employees, and planning. Effective business communication skills, ethics, and social responsibility are also emphasized.

 

 

  1. BBB4M – International Business Fundamentals

COURSE description

COURSE Title: International Business Fundamentals

Course Code: BBB4M

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

Curriculum Policy Document:

The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: Business Studies, (2006-Revised)

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/business1112currb.pdf

Department: Business Studies

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets.

Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for postsecondary programs in business, including international business, marketing, and management.

 

  1. CIA4U – Canadian and World Studies

COURSE description

COURSE Title: Analysing Current Economic Issues

Course Code: CIA4U

Grade: 12

Course Type: University

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: Any university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.

Curriculum Policy Document:

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/2015cws11and12.pdf

Department: Canadian and World Studies

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Lidia Petrone

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course examines current Canadian and international economic issues, developments, policies, and practices from diverse perspectives. Students will explore the decisions that individuals and institutions, including governments, make in response to economic issues such as globalization, trade agreements, economic inequalities, regulation, and public spending. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, as well as economic models and theories, to investigate, and develop informed opinions about, economic trade-offs, growth, and sustainability and related economic issues.

 

  1. HHS4U – Social Sciences and Humanities

COURSE description

COURSE Title: Families in Canada, Grade 12, University Preparation
Course Code: HHS4U
Grade: 12
Course Type: University
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: Any university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
Curriculum Policy Document: Social Sciences and Humanities, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 to 12, 2013 (Revised)

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/ssciences9to122013.pdf

Department: Social Science and Humanities

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online and onsite

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course enables students to draw on sociological, psychological, and anthropological theories and research to analyse the development of individuals, intimate relationships, and family and parent-child relationships. Students will focus on issues and challenges facing individuals and families in Canada’s diverse society. They will develop analytical tools that enable them to assess various factors affecting families and to consider policies and practices intended to support families in Canada. They will develop the investigative skills required to conduct and communicate the results of research on individuals, intimate relationships, and parent-child relationships.

 

  1. OLC4O – Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course

COURSE description

Course Title: Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course

Course Code: OLC4O

Grade: 12

Course Type: Open

Credit Value: 1.0

Prerequisite: Students who have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the course. (Students who have already met the literacy requirement for graduation may be eligible to take the course under special circumstances, at the discretion of the principal.)

Curriculum Policy Document: English – The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC), The Ontario Curriculum, Grade 12, 2003  http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/english12curr.pdf

Department: English

Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online / Lidia Petrone

Development Date: 2023

Course Description:

This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation.

Students will read a variety of informational, narrative, and graphic texts and produce various forms of writing, including summaries, information paragraphs, opinion pieces, and news reports. Students will also maintain and manage a portfolio containing a record of their reading experiences and samples of their writing.

 

  1. IDC4U Interdisciplinary Studies: Data Science

Course description

Course Title: Interdisciplinary Studies: Data Science
Course Code: IDC4U
Grade: 12
Course Type: University Preparation
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: Any university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course.
Curriculum Policy Document: Interdisciplinary Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2002

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/interdisciplinary1112curr.pdf
Course Developer: Virtute Innovation Academy online
Development Date: 2023
Course Description:

This course will help students develop and consolidate the skills required for and knowledge of different subjects and disciplines to solve problems, make decisions, create personal meaning, and present findings beyond the scope of a single subject or discipline. Students will apply the principles and processes of inquiry and research to effectively use a range of print, electronic, and mass media resources; to analyse historical innovations and exemplary research; and to investigate real-life situations and career opportunities in interdisciplinary endeavours. They will also assess their own cognitive and affective strategies, apply general skills in both familiar and new contexts, create innovative products, and communicate new knowledge.

 

Programs for Exceptional Students

Recognizing the needs of exceptional students and designing courses to meet those needs are important and challenging aspects of program planning. Students who have an existing Individual Education Plan will have that IEP honored at Virtute Innovation Academy through the implementation of appropriate accommodations.

Reaching Ahead

Elementary school students may reach ahead and take high school credits. This may occur only after the Principal of Virtute Innovation Academy consults with the student, the parents or guardian, and the Principal of the elementary school of the student. The Virtute Innovation Academy Principal must ensure that the learning expectations of the Grade 8 course have been met. The Principal is also responsible for evaluating the student’s achievement of the expectations of the Virtute Innovation Academy secondary school course. Virtute Innovation Academy will issue the OSSD credit.

 

Online Courses Available

Students may register for any course at any time during the calendar year, progress through at their own rate and finish the course at any time up to 18 months from the time of registration.

 

How to gain access to Outlines of the Courses of Study

All course outlines can be accessed on the Virtute Innovation Academy Website (https://www.viaschool.ca/) by clicking on the course code.

 

How to gain access to Ontario curriculum policy documents

All curriculum policy documents can be accessed on the Virtute Innovation Academy Website (https://www.viaschool.ca/) by clicking on the course code. Alternatively, they can be found on the Ontario Ministry of Education website.

 

Descriptions of experiential learning programs such as cooperative education and job shadowing

Cooperative Education

Cooperative education is a hands-on method of learning that allows students to earn secondary school credits towards their OSSD by combining in-school studies with related work experiences. The student’s learning activities at the work placement are closely aligned to one or more related course(s) in which the student is enrolled or which he or she has successfully completed. The cooperative education course and the related course(s) together constitute a student’s cooperative education program.

The cooperative education course includes pre-placement, integration and placement components. The Ontario Ministry of Education Policy document for Cooperative Education and Other Forms of Experiential Learning, provides an overview of required hours for each of these components.

Students must remain at their placements until the date stipulated in their Work Education Agreement, even in cases where the required course hours have been completed before the end of the school term. The completion date of this agreement coincides with the completion date of other school courses.

Cooperative education will be available to Virtute Innovation Academy students from Grades 11-12. It is possible for a Grade 10 student to be placed in the Cooperative education program, but it will be determined by the principal on a case-by-case basis.

 

Policy regarding student withdrawal from courses in Grades 11 and 12

procedures related to changing course types

Changing Course Types

A student may change his or her educational goals in secondary school. If the student decides to embark on a new pathway, he or she may find that a prerequisite course that has not been completed, is now required. Virtute Innovation Academy makes provisions to allow its students to make such changes of direction and clearly describes these provisions in the Virtute Innovation Academy course calendar. In most cases, a student may enroll in a different type of course in a given subject in Grade 10 than the type he or she completed in Grade 9, although doing so may require additional preparation, as recommended by the Virtute Innovation Academy Principal. In the case of mathematics, however, the sole prerequisite for the Grade 10 academic mathematics course is the Grade 9 academic mathematics course, so a student who is planning to move from the Grade 9 applied mathematics course to the Grade 10 academic mathematics course must take either the Grade 9 academic mathematics course (MPM1D) or the designated transfer course (MPM1H). In Grades 10 to 12, a student may change to a different type of course in a given subject provided that the student has taken any course specified as a prerequisite for that course. If the student has not done so, he or she may take one of the specified prerequisite courses through Virtute Innovation Academy. If the Virtute Innovation Academy Principal or the Principal at the student’s bricks-and-mortar school believes that a student can be successful in a particular course without having taken the specified prerequisite course, then either Principal may waive the prerequisite.

the Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition processes for equivalency and if applicable, challenge

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) is the formal evaluation and credit granting process whereby students may obtain credits for prior learning. Prior learning includes the knowledge and skills that you have acquired, in both formal and informal ways, outside of secondary school. You may have your knowledge and skills evaluated against the expectations outlined in provincial curriculum policy documents in order to earn credits towards the secondary school diploma. All credits granted through the PLAR process must represent the same standards of achievement as credits granted to students who have taken the courses.

Through a formal evaluation and accreditation process known as Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR), students enrolled in Ontario secondary schools in inspected private schools that choose to implement PLAR, may have their skills and knowledge evaluated against the overall expectations outlined in provincial curriculum policy documents in order to earn credits towards the secondary school diploma. PLAR procedures are carried out under the direction of the school principal, who grants the credits.

The PLAR process developed by an inspected private school in compliance with ministry policy involves two components: challenge and equivalency. The challenge process is the process whereby students’ prior learning is assessed for the purpose of granting credit for a course developed from a provincial curriculum policy document. The equivalency process involves the assessment of credentials from other jurisdictions.

PLAR for Regular Day School Students:

Because young people benefit in many ways from the learning experiences offered in secondary school, PLAR has a specific, limited function in the Ontario secondary school program. For regular day school students, a maximum of 4 credits may be granted through the challenge process for Grade 10, 11, and 12 courses; or for Levels 1, 2, and 3 in classical languages courses; for Levels 2, 3, and 4 in international languages courses; and for Levels 3, 4, and 5 in Native languages courses. No more than 2 of these credits may be granted in one discipline.

For students who are transferring from home schooling, a non-inspected private school, or a school outside Ontario, principals will grant equivalency credits for placement purposes based on their evaluation of the student’s previous learning (see section 4.3.2 and Appendix 2 in OS).

PLAR procedures must also be available to exceptional students. Assessment strategies must be adapted for this group in keeping with their special needs; for example, extra time might be allowed for the completion of work, or a quiet environment might be provided for activities. While PLAR may be of benefit to some gifted students, it is not intended to be used as a replacement for or alternative to enriched or other special programs for gifted students. PPM No. 129  outlines in detail the PLAR policy and requirements that apply to regular day school students.

PLAR for Mature Students:

A mature student is a student who is at least eighteen years of age on or before December 31 of the school year in which he or she registers in an Ontario secondary school program; who was not enrolled as a regular day school student for a period of at least one school year immediately preceding his or her registration in a secondary school program (for mature students, a school year is a period of no less than ten consecutive months immediately preceding the student’s return to school); and who is enrolled in a secondary program for the purpose of obtaining an OSSD. Because of the broader life experience of mature students, the requirements concerning the application of PLAR procedures are different for them than for regular day school students. Principals will determine the number of credits, including compulsory credits, that a mature student needs in order to meet the credit requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). At the discretion of the principal, up to 16 Grade 9 and 10 equivalency credits may be granted to a mature student following an individual assessment. Mature students may earn 10 of the 14 remaining Grade 11 and 12 credits needed to meet diploma requirements in three ways:

  • they may demonstrate achievement of the required secondary school curriculum expectations and receive credit through the challenge process;
  • they may present education and/or training credentials for assessment through the equivalency process; or
  • they may take the course.
  • It should be noted that Levels 2 and 3 in classical languages are equivalent to Grades 11 and 12, respectively; that Levels 3 and 4 in international languages are equivalent to Grades 11 and 12, respectively; and that Levels 4 and 5 in Native languages are equivalent to Grades 11 and 12, respectively.
  • Mature students must earn a minimum of 4 Grade 11 and 12 credits by taking the course at a secondary school (or through any of the options outlined in section 10). Mature students who have previously accumulated 26 or more credits towards the diploma must successfully complete the required number of courses to bring their total number of credits up to 30 before they will be eligible to receive the OSSD. Mature students working towards the OSSD under OS/OSS must also satisfy the diploma requirements with regard to the provincial secondary school literacy requirement. Principals will determine the number of hours of community involvement activities that a mature student will have to complete.

PPM No. 132 outlines in detail the PLAR policy and requirements that apply to mature students.

Regular day school students who transfer to an Ontario secondary school from a school outside Ontario or from a non-inspected private school may be granted equivalent credits through the PLAR equivalency process for regular day school students based on the principal’s evaluation of their previous learning. The total number of equivalent credits and the corresponding number of compulsory credits are recorded on the OST. The equivalent credits should be entered as a total, and the required items of information should appear as follows: “Equivalent Credits” should be entered in the “Course Title” column; “PLE” in the “Course Code” column; “EQV” in the “Percentage Grade” column; the total number of credits in the “Credit” column; and the total number of compulsory credits in the “Compulsory” column.

The Ontario Student Transcript (OST): Manual, 2010, p.13-1

Request for a PLAR Assessment

  • You may ask for an assessment of your diploma requirements after you have successfully completed one course with Virtute Innovation Academy and submitted an original student transcript.
  • If you have completed the eligibility requirements outlined on the PLAR Fact Sheet, you will be asked to complete the PLAR Application Package.

 

Information on evaluation and examination policies

For final exams, students must come in person to the our physical Virtute Innovation Academy physical office building location within a designated room to write their final exams where will be monitored throughout the time allotted for them to complete writing their exams.

Students who are unbale to come in person to the Virtute Innovation Academy physical office building to write their final exams will need to go to their selected proctor’s office to complete writing their final exams.

For students who will not be able to write their final exams in person at the Virtute Innovation Academy and do not have a proctor and will not be able to go to a proctor’s office to complete writing their final exams, a designated Virtute Innovation Academy staff member will monitor them online using a camera to watch each student at all times throughout the entire allotted time given to write and complete their final exams.

If you have further questions, but also message here please at yitian.shi@viaschool.ca and principal@viaschool.ca

 

Information on reporting procedures, including the school’s report card and the Ontario Student Transcript

 

Ontario Student Record

A student’s OSR continues resides at their home school. If a student takes a Reach Ahead or Make-up course with Virtute Innovation Academy, when the course is finished, Virtute Innovation Academy will send official copies of the final report card back to the home school where the credit will be added to the ongoing transcript for that student.

The Ontario Student Record (OSR) is a physical file folder containing the official school records for a student. An OSR must exist for every student registered in an Ontario School. The contents of the OSR are protected by the Education Act and Freedom of Information legislation for the Province of Ontario.

If a student is no longer registered with their school but wishes to take a course or courses with Virtute Innovation Academy then the OSR must be moved to Virtute Innovation Academy.

A student who has not previously attended a public, a Catholic, an inspected Ontario private school or an Ontario International School will not have an OSR and an OSR will have to be established. Virtute Innovation Academy will be responsible for establishing the OSR and issuing an Ontario Education Number (OEN) to the student.

 

OSR Transfer:

If the student transfers to another Ontario school prior to earning their diploma with Virtute Innovation Academy, the OSR must follow them. Virtute Innovation Academy will be required to send the OSR and all its associated documents to the new school.

 

The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) is an official document issued by public, Catholic, and inspected private schools in Ontario or Ontario International Schools. The OST contains a list of the courses completed (successfully or unsuccessfully), withdrawals from courses occurring 5 days or longer after the midterm report card has been issued, repeated courses in Grades 11 and 12, and equivalent credits granted for work in non-inspected Ontario private schools or schools outside of Ontario. The OST is stored in the OSR and retained for 55 years after a student retires from school.

If the student is currently attending another school – public or private – and is simply taking a single course from Virtute Innovation Academy, then that student’s OSR continues to reside at the school that the student is attending. Upon completion of the course with Virtute Innovation Academy, Virtute Innovation Academy will send a copy of the report card back to the home school where the course will be added to the ongoing list of courses on the student’s transcript.

The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) is an official document maintained by Ontario schools for each student. The OST is stored in the student’s Ontario Student Record (OSR) and retained for 55 years after a student retires from school. It is a record of all secondary school coursework and diploma requirements. The OST will be issued to students whose OSR is held by Virtute Innovation Academy.

 

Withdrawal from a Course

  • Withdrawals occurring within 5 days of the issuing of the first report card from Virtute Innovation Academy will result in the mark not being recorded on the OST.
  • A withdrawal from a Grade 11 or 12 course after 5 days of the issuing of the first report card results in a “W” being entered in the “Credit” column of the OST along with the mark at the time of the withdrawal.
  • Withdrawals at any time from Grade 9 or 10 courses are not recorded on the OST.
  • If there are extraordinary circumstances relating to a student’s withdrawal from a course, an “S” may be entered in the “Note” column on the OST.
  • Please refer to 4.1.2 Ontario Schools: Kindergarten to Grade 12

 

Repetition of a Course

  • Only one credit is earned if course is repeated.
  • In Grade 11 and 12, an “R” appears on the student’s OST for the course with the lower mark.

 

Equivalent Credits

Out of province students or transfers from non-inspected private schools may be granted equivalent credits upon the Principal’s evaluation of the student’s previous learning.

  • “Equivalent Credits” are entered in the “Course Title” column.
  • “PLE” entered in the “Course Code” column.
  • “EQV” in the “Percentage Grade” column.
  • the total number of credits entered into the “Credit” column.
  • and the number of compulsory credits entered into the “Compulsory” column.

 

Please note: In September 1999, the Ontario Ministry of Education instructed that schools in Ontario implement a policy of full disclosure. This policy states that all grade 11 and 12 courses attempted by students must be recorded on Ontario Student Transcripts.

 

Assessment, Evaluation & Reporting of Student Achievement

Every student attending Virtute Innovation Academy is considered to be unique. Each student must have opportunities to achieve success according to his or her own interests, abilities and goals. The Virtute Innovation Academy assessment and evaluation policy requires that all educators be:

  1. Fair for all students.
  1. Support all students, including students with an Individual Education Plan (IEP).
  2. Relate to curriculum expectations as well as interest of all students.
  3. Clearly communicate to students and parents.
  4. Ongoing, varied in nature.
  5. Provide descriptive feedback that is meaningful and timely to support learning.
  6. Develop student self-assessments

 

Assessment and Evaluation Strategies

In order to ensure that assessment and evaluation are valid and reliable, and that they lead to the improvement of student learning, teachers must use assessment and evaluation strategies that:

  • address both what students learn and how well they learn;
  • are based both on the categories of knowledge and skills and on the achievement level descriptions given in the achievement chart that appears in the curriculum policy document for each discipline;
  • are varied in nature, administered over a period of time, and designed to provide opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning;
  • are appropriate for the learning activities used, the purposes of instruction, and the needs and experiences of the students;
  • are fair to all students;
  • accommodate the needs of exceptional students, consistent with the strategies outlined in their Individual Education Plan (IEP);
  • accommodate the needs of students who are learning the language of instruction;
  • ensure that each student is given clear directions for improvement;
  • promote students’ ability to assess their own learning and to set specific goals;
  • include the use of samples of students’ work that provide evidence of their achievement, and
  • are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the course and at other appropriate points throughout the course.

 

ASSESSMENT

Assessment is the process of gathering information from a variety of sources (including assignments, demonstrations, projects, performances, and tests) that accurately reflect how well a student is achieving the curriculum expectations in a subject or course. The primary purpose of assessment is to improve student learning. Assessment for the purpose of improving student learning is seen as both “assessment for learning” and “assessment as learning”. Information gathered through assessment helps teachers to determine students’ strengths and weaknesses in their achievement of the overall curriculum expectations in each course. This information also serves to guide teachers in adapting curriculum and instructional approaches to students’ needs and in assessing the overall effectiveness of programs and classroom practices.

As part of assessment for learning, teachers provide students with descriptive

feedback that guides their efforts towards improvement. Descriptive feedback

helps students learn by providing them with specific information about what they are doing well, what needs improvement, and what specific steps they can take to improve. Multiple opportunities for feedback and follow-up are provided during a student’s course to allow for improvement in learning prior to assessment of learning (evaluation).

 

EVALUATION

Evaluation refers to the process of judging the quality of student work on the basis of established criteria, and assigning a value to represent that quality. In Ontario secondary schools, the value assigned will be in the form of a percentage grade.

Although all curriculum expectations in a course are accounted for in instruction, student evaluations focus solely on a student’s achievement of the overall curriculum expectations in his or her course. Evidence of student achievement for evaluation is collected over the duration of a course and is based on observations, conversations, and student products. Evaluation is based on the assessment of learning that provides evidence of student achievement at strategic times throughout each course, typically at the end of a module of study.

 

The Achievement Chart

 

Assessment and Evaluation: Categories of Knowledge and Skills

 

The achievement chart in the Ministry of Education Growing Success Document, 2010 identifies four categories of knowledge and skills that are common to both the elementary and secondary panels and to all subject areas and disciplines. The categories, defined by clear criteria, represent four broad areas of knowledge and skills within which the expectations for any given subject/course can be organized. The four categories should be considered as interrelated, reflecting the wholeness and interconnectedness of learning. The categories help teachers to focus not only on students’ acquisition of knowledge but also on their development of the skills of thinking, communication, and application. The evaluation of these items in the course

will span into two larger components: 70% for the initial portion and 30%, which represents the Final Exam and/or Culminating Activity. Among the 70% each of the courses at Virtute Innovation Academy make a conscious attempt to ensure the balance of the categories below (within reason) to ensure students are provided with the best opportunities for success. For example, a course may split the 70% of the categories into 17.5% each.

 

The categories of knowledge and skills are as follows (also known as KICA):

  • Knowledge and Understanding: Subject-specific content acquired in each grade/course (knowledge), and the comprehension of its meaning and significance (understanding)
  • Thinking: The use of critical and creative thinking skills and/or processes
  • Communication: The conveying of meaning through various forms
  • Application: The use of knowledge and skills to make connections within and between various contexts

The achievement chart for each subject matter is included in the curriculum policy document, specific to that discipline. The chart provides a reference point for all assessment practices and a framework within which to assess and evaluate student achievement.

  • The chart is organized into four broad categories; Knowledge / Understanding, Thinking / Inquiry, Communication, and Application / Making Connections. The names of the categories differ slightly from one discipline to another, reflecting differences in the disciplines.
  • The achievement chart describes the levels of achievement of the curriculum expectations within each category. The descriptions associated with each level serve as a guide for gathering assessment information, to enable teachers to make consistent judgements about the quality of student work, and to provide clear feedback to students.
  • The achievement chart provides teachers with a provincial standard to use in assessing and evaluating their students’ achievement. A variety of materials are to be made available to assist teachers in improving their assessment methods and strategies and, hence, their assessment of student achievement.
  • The following table provides a summary description of achievement in each percentage grade range and corresponding level of achievement:

 

Achievement Chart

Percentage Grade Range

Achievement Level

Summary Description

80-100%

Level 4

A very high to outstanding level of achievement. Achievement is above the provincial standard.

70-79%

Level 3

A high level of achievement. Achievement is at the provincial standard.

60-69%

Level 2

A moderate level of achievement. Achievement is below, but approaching, the provincial standard.

50-59%

Level 1

A passable level of achievement. Achievement is below the provincial standard.

below 50%

Level R

Insufficient achievement of curriculum expectations. A credit will not be granted.

 

NOTE: Level 3 (70-79%) is the provincial standard. Teachers and parents can be confident that students who are achieving at level 3 are well prepared for work in the next grade or a subsequent course. A student whose achievement is below 50% at the end of the course will not obtain credit for the course.

 

Reporting Student Achievement

Student achievement is communicated formally to students and parents by means of the Virtute Innovation Academy “Secondary School Report Card, Grades 9-12”.

Reporting on Achievement of Curriculum Expectations

The report card, which follows the Provincial Report Card very closely, provides a record of the student’s achievement of the curriculum expectations in the form of a percentage grade. This reflects the corresponding level of achievement as described in the achievement chart for the discipline.

  • A final grade is recorded for every course, and credit is granted and recorded for every course in which the student’s grade is 50% or higher.
  • The final grade for each course in Grades 9-12 will be determined as follows: 70% of the grade will be based on evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade should reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration should be given to more recent evidence of achievement. 30% of the grade will be based on a final evaluation. This may be a final examination, a rich summative task t, or a combination of both an exam and an RST.

 

Evaluation refers to the process of judging the quality of student learning on the basis of established performance standards and assigning a value to represent that quality. Evaluation is based on “assessment of learning”.

While all curriculum expectations must be accounted for in instruction and assessment, the evaluation focuses on students’ achievement of the overall expectations. A student’s achievement of the overall expectation is evaluated on the basis of their achievement of related specific expectations. Teachers will use their professional judgment to determine which specific expectations should be used to evaluate the achievement of the overall expectations. Evidence of student achievement for evaluation is collected over time from three different sources; observations, conversations and student products. Evaluation is the responsibility of the teacher and does not include the judgment of the student’s peers.

Reporting on Demonstrated Learning Skills and Work Habits

The report card provides a record of the learning skills demonstrated by the student in every course. The 6 identified learning skills and work habits are: (1) Responsibility, (2) Organization, (3) Independent Work, (4) Collaboration, (5) Initiative, (6) Self-regulation. The learning skills and work habits are evaluated using a four-point scale: (E – Excellent, G – Good, S – Satisfactory, N – Needs Improvement).

Teacher Comments

The report card also includes teachers’ comments on the student’s strengths, weaknesses, and areas in which improvement is needed.

 

Methods of Evaluation

Teachers will take various considerations into account before making a decision about the grade to be entered on the report card. Teachers will consider all evidence collected from all products submitted or not submitted. Some evidence may carry more weight than others. Teachers will consider all evidence and use their professional judgment to determine the student’s report card grade. Determining a report card grade will involve the teacher’s professional judgment and interpretation of evidence and should reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement, with special consideration given to the more recent evidence. The Principal will work with teachers to ensure common and equitable grading practices that follow Ministry policy. For Grades 7 to 12, a student’s achievement of the overall curriculum expectations will be evaluated in accordance with the achievement chart and will be reported as percentage grades. It is expected that both mathematical calculations and professional judgment will inform the determination of the percentage mark.

Final Examination

  • Each course has a final assessment that will be given as a final examination, a final project, or a combination of both an exam and a project.
  • Students in the same course should be similarly evaluated, which means that final exams assessments will use the same format although particular questions may be different among the students.
  • A course with a final examination must be written in a supervised environment with a proctor. A proctored exam is one that is overseen by an impartial individual, the Proctor, who monitors and supervises a student while he or she is taking the final exam. The Proctor enters the private password to allow students access to the final exam. The Proctor ensures the security and integrity of the exam process. Students in online courses with final exams, must fulfill their responsibilities in arranging and taking a proctored final exam.

Coursework

  • Students must complete all of the assigned coursework.
  • Coursework may include assignments, tests, projects, labs, discussions, etc.
  • Students assume the responsibility to ensure that they have completed all of the assigned requirements of the course before completing the final exam or assessment task.
  • Once the final exam is written or the final assessment is submitted, no further assignments may be submitted, unless prior arrangements have been made between the student and the teacher. Students will receive zeros for any incomplete assignments.

Guidance and Career Programs

Virtute Innovation Academy will provide individual student counseling with respect to course selection and post-secondary planning. By doing so, individual student needs and concerns are met and appropriate plans can be put into place. In addition, the skills and competencies that students acquire through the guidance and career education program outlined in Ontario’s “Creating Pathways to Success: An Education and Career/Life Planning Program for Ontario Schools, 2013” will not only help students succeed in school, but will also contribute to their success in the workplace.

 

Virtute Innovation Academy does the following to support students:

 

  1. supports English Language Learners, when necessary, by providing instructional and assessment accommodations within courses;
  2. provides opportunities within the Four Areas of Learning in Education and Career/Life Planning (Knowing Yourself, Exploring Opportunities, Making Decisions and Setting Goals, Achieving Goals and Making Transitions) in all newly revised courses;
  3. provides individual assistance and short-term counseling to students, when requested;
  4. provides current information on post-secondary programs and admission requirements to all of its college/university bound students;
  5. provides the opportunity for Grade 8 students to “Reach Ahead” to Grade 9 courses with the approval of their elementary school Principal. This program allows students to explore course options and academic interests early in their high school career;
  6. provides access to Career Cruising or My Blueprint for all students whose Ontario Student Record is held at Virtute Innovation Academy. This program allows students to plan their education, review their options for post-secondary programs and assists in the course selection process;
  • communicates directly with Ontario Universities Application Centre and Ontario College Application Service regarding student achievement;
  • communicates directly with post-secondary institutions regarding student achievement.

 

What is an Exceptional Student?

All students require support from teachers, classmates, family, and friends in order to thrive and to gain full benefit from their school experience. Some students have special needs that require supports beyond those ordinarily received in the school setting. In Ontario, students who have behavioural, communicational, intellectual, physical or multiple exceptionalities, may have educational needs that cannot be met through regular instructional and assessment practices. These needs may be met through accommodations, and/or an educational program that is modified above or below the age-appropriate grade level expectations for a particular subject or course. Such students may be formally identified as exceptional pupils.

What is Virtute Innovation Academy’s role?

Virtute Innovation Academy must develop an Individual Education Plan (IEP) for every full time identified student. Virtute Innovation Academy also has the discretion to develop an IEP for students who have not been formally identified as exceptional, but who are receiving special education programs and/or special education services.

An IEP is a written plan describing the special education program and/or services required by a particular student, based on a thorough assessment of the student’s strengths and needs that affect the student’s ability to learn and demonstrate learning.

A student’s IEP must typically have a direct progress reporting link to the Report Card. If the student has an existing IEP, please send a copy of this IEP to Virtute Innovation Academy upon registration.

What does an IEP enable?

An IEP identifies the student’s specific learning expectations and outlines how the school will address these expectations through appropriate accommodations within their online and blended learning courses. Using the IEP, Virtute Innovation Academy will implement those capabilities of the system which will be particularly appropriate in meeting the student’s needs.

How does an IEP work?

Assignments and activities within the online and blended learning courses must take into account the strengths, needs, learning expectations, and accommodations identified in the student’s IEP. Accommodations may include reducing the workload, simplifying tasks and material, differentiating lessons and assignments and providing more time for learning and the completion of activities. The assistance of other persons and the use of specialized equipment may also be required to accommodate the student’s needs.

What if the student does not have an IEP, but requires accommodations?

In special circumstances, a student may require accommodations to be made in their course. If a student requires accommodations due to reasons not outlined in an IEP, the student will need to submit a note from a consulting physician and/or professional. This document should indicate the accommodations required and the reasons for the accommodations to be made. However, at Virtute Innovation Academy we strive to individualize and differentiate our teaching strategies for all students to meet their learning styles and needs.